The Warren Register of Colonial Tall Ships

Saturday, March 16, 2013

CAPEHORN RUNNERS DOWNEASTERS AND PACKET SHIPS

This post may take a little time to complete as I am now slowly going blind. Please bear with me if I make the occasional error. I will insert as many ships as possible and apply any immigrant details whenever found.
I suspect that the finishing date will be approximately February or March 2016 and any donations to this site would be much appreciated. Please donate as funds are needed to keep research and workload running. You do not need a PayPal account to use PayPal and it is totally safe to do so. To send funds via PayPal just use email ray.j.warren@hotmail.com if you would like to assist. Even a two dollar note or coin will be appreciated.

                   American Fleets
Many wonderful books have been written on America's many diverse fleets, the passenger services, the Grain fleets, the Fish trade, Guano, Coal, Timber you name it they have shipped it all over the world. They also had a large Whaling fleet that thankfully is now gone whilst the whales recuperate and get some of their numbers back.
I will try to cover every major event and will borrow heavily from newspaper clippings, shipping lists and from great Authors like Basil Lubbock whom I consider second to none in the world of sailing ships.

CONVICT SHIPS.
Chapter #1
This is perhaps one subject that will not go down well with many Americans but in reality, many convict ships brought their forebears to America especially during the years 1718 through 1776 where convicts were used alongside African slaves in the fields and plantations of the American mainland. The West Indies Plantations were used prior to 1718 as destinations for convicts. Black slavery was a product of the English during the years in which America was controlled by them But when the English had gone, slavery had to be picked up in the African trade so that the plantations could be better man powered.
It is intolerable that the records for the convict ships have mostly been destroyed but I have seen full lists of convicts among Australian records for both America and South African shipments. One American publication that purports to give such lists is;
The complete book of emigrants in bondage 1614-1775  [compiled by] Peter Wilson Coldham. This book [I believe] covers the American convict transportation only.

It is common knowledge that America has rid itself of it's convict background in an effort to look "clean" but this has made it difficult for those who wish to know their forefathers and believe me, America received it's fair share of convicts during the 1700's. The only worry with having a transported convict ancestor is finding your roots if the records have been destroyed, ask any Australian or South African, there is nothing to be ashamed of by having a convict ancestor. Somewhere in history it is likely that all families had their black sheep who were not particularly nice convict or not.

Slave Ships  
Chapter #2
As people will always do anything when there is money around, taking prisoners for use as slaves either legally or illegally and even in between, will be cause for concern in history, in the modern day and in the future. Listed below are a few of the vessels that transported slaves to America from the very early days up until the American civil war put paid to the open slavery trade.


Adelaide [French Ship]
Antelope [Spanish ship]
Aurore [French Ship]
Duc Du Maine [French]
Braunfisch [Brandenburg ship]
Brookes [probably British or American ship]
La Amistad [ probably French]
City of Norfolk [American]
Clotilde [porobably American]
Cora [Perhaps British or American]"
Creole [American or British]
Desire [American]

Elizabeth [British]
Fredensborg [Danish Ship
Guerro [Spanish]
Hannibal [English]
Henrietta Marie [American?]
Hope [American Brig]
Jesus of Lubeck [rented to Captain Hawkins by Queen Elizabeth the first in 1564 for the West  Indies trade]
Kron Printxen [Danish ship]
Le Concord [became Queen Anne's Revenge as Pirate ship probably British]
Lord Ligonier [Probably French, used in Alex Haley's fiction "Roots".
Don Francisco [later named James Matthews, probably Spanish or American] 
Madre De Deus [Spanish or Portuguese]
Manuela [was originally the clipper Sunny South]
Margaret Scott [probably American]
Meermin [Dutch East India ship destroyed by Madagascar slaves]
Nightingale [American or British] 
Pons [American Bark]
Salamander [Brandenburg ship]
Sao Jose Paquete [Portuguese]
Sally [American vessel]
Tecora [Portuguese]
Trouyadore [perhaps Portuguese ship]
Wanderer[second to last slaver to the USA]
Wildfire [Probably an American Bark]
Whydah Gally [Probably British, later became a Pirate ship]
Zong [British slaver that threw her slaves overboard in chains in 1781] 

 


PACKET SHIPS
Chapter #3
Most of the ships I will mention or describe in this post will not have much more than a description due to the American registry being something that I am not too old to dig into. I can though place any incoming information on ships and any data on ships that I have not mentioned.
Early shipping to the Americas was of course handled by England, Spain, Germany, Holland and France with other nationalities joining in as America got into the mainstream.
It did not take them long to begin their own shipping lines and Navy and by Napoleonic times, were quite adept at their seaworthiness.
Early shipping lines were led by the Blackball Line followed by the Red Line and others. By this time, America had set it's sight on being the fastest with ships on  any ocean.

List of Shipping Lines
Black Ball Line.
Red Star Line.
Dramatic Line.
The Black X line.
The Black Star line
The Patriotic line
The Jewel line
White Diamond line 
The Philadelphia line
More to Come
                  AMERICAN CAPE HORNERS 
                                       AND
                          ISLAND TRADERS
Chapter #4
 [Listed by year of construction] 
  copyright R.J.Warren 2011-2012 

At the end of the first half of the 19th century, the American ship building industry had begun to make its mark and some of the finest ship building in the world took place there at that time.

American ships proved to be faster and stronger than their British counterparts and England became a market place for American built ships. 

The new clipper shape and the extraordinary times taken by the America-England traders helped shape the second half of that century and gave the gold seekers and emigrants the speed they wished for their journeys. Below are listed a few of the better-known ships of America that were not listed in the Seven Seas Register of Tall Ships. 

The following vessels are listed in the year of their construction rather than alphabetically, except where there are two ships of the same name. I have listed these together to show the date and tonnage difference between them 

EMERALD’ Built 1822. Wood ship of 359 Tons. Length; 110 ft. Breadth; 27 ft. Depth; app17 ft. Built for the Jewel Line of Boston by Thatcher Magoun of Medford on the Mystic river. Master; Captain Philip Fox. 

‘COURIER’ Built 1842. Wood ship of 380 Tons. Built at Newburyport 

‘ASHBURTON’ Built 1842-3. Wood ship of 449 Tons. Length; app 155 ft. Breadth; app 31 ft. Depth; app 19.5 ft. Built at Newburyport. Master; Captain Henry Huttleston. 

‘ST GEORGE’ Built 1843. Wood ship of 845 Tons. Built at Newburyport as a Packet ship. She was the first ship of the American ‘Red Cross’ line and was built by Donald McKay and Pickett at Newburyport and also being one of the last ships he built there before going to Boston. This shipping line was also known as the ‘St Georges Cross’ line. 

‘JOHN R. SKIDDY’ Built 1844. Wood ship of 930 Tons. Built at Newburyport as a Packet ship. 

NEW WORLD’ Built 1846. Wood ship of 1400 Tons. Built for the SwallowTail Line by Donald McKay. Master; Captain William Skiddy.

‘OCEAN MONARCH’ Built 1848. Wood ship of app 1400 Tons. Built by Donald McKay at Boston as a Packet ship. 

‘TAM O’SHANTER’ I. Built 1849. Wood ship of 777 Tons. She was lost off Cape Cod in December 1853. Although her career was only twelve years, she proved a good money-spinner.

‘ANTARCTIC’ Built c1850. Wood packet ship of 850 Tons. Built for Zeriga and Co of New York by Donald Mackay. 

‘STAFFORDSHIRE’ Built 1851. Wood ship of 1817 Tons. Built by Donald McKay for Enoch Train and Co. Master; Captain Josiah Richardson. She was wrecked when bound for Liverpool on the 30th of December 1854. She ran onto Blonde Rock at Cape Sable in fog, she was washed back off the rock into deep water and she foundered. One hundred and seventy lives were lost including her captain.

‘WIZARD’ Built 1852. She was sold and renamed ‘Queen of the Colonies’ and operated on the Queensland run in the early 1860’s.She became famous in that state as a quarantined ship with fever aboard. She was sent to Caloundra about 100 miles north of Brisbane where she remained until the crisis was over. 

‘BALD EAGLE’ Built 1852. Wood ship of 1790 Tons. Built at Boston as a medium clipper. 

‘STAR OF EMPIRE’ Built 1853. Wood ship of 2050 Tons. Built by Donald McKay for the White Diamond line. She was a sister to ‘Chariot of Fame’ and both were used in the emigrant trade to Australia and New Zealand. 

‘DAVID CROCKETT’ Built 1853. Wood ship of 1679 Tons. Length; 218.8 ft. Breadth; 41 ft. Depth; 19.7 ft. Built by Greenman and Co of Stonnington Conn, for Handy and Everett. This vessel had a wonderful sailing career but an ignominious end. She was sold to F. L. Neall of Philadelphia and was turned into a schooner barge. In February 1899, she was wrecked while under the command of Captain B. G. Pendleton. 

‘CHARIOT OF FAME’ Built 1853. Wood ship of 2050 Tons. Built at Boston as a medium clipper.

‘EMPRESS OF THE SEAS I’ Built 1853. Wood ship of 2200 Tons. Built at Boston as a clipper. 

‘ROMANCE OF THE SEAS’ Built 1853. Wood ship of 1782 Tons. Built at Boston as a Clipper ship.

‘DREADNOUGHT’ Built 1854. Wood ship of 1400 Tons. Length; 200 ft. Breadth; 40.25 ft. Depth; 26 ft. Built at Newburyport for the Red Cross Line. They had her built for their best Master; Captain Samuel Samuels. She was one of the elite carriers between England and America. She was transferred to the ‘Downeaster’ trade late in her life and she became a victim of Cape Horn when she went ashore on Tierra Del Fuego in 1869. This event happened in calm seas due to a dropping off of the winds, leaving the vessel helpless in an area and coast from which she could not be saved.

‘DEFENDER’ Built 1855. Wood ship of 1413 Tons. Length; app 180 ft. Breadth; app 33 ft. Depth; app 21 ft. Built at Boston as a medium clipper. 

‘ABBOT LAWRENCE’ Built 1855. Wood ship of app 1400 Tons. Length; app 160 ft. Breadth; app 36 ft. Depth; app 21 ft. Built at Boston as a medium clipper.

‘MASTIFF’ Built 1856. Wood ship of 1035 Tons. Built at Boston as a Medium clipper ship.

‘MINNEHAHA’ Built 1856. Wood ship of 1698 Tons. Length: approx. 198 ft. Breadth: approx. 36 ft. Depth: approx. 23 ft. Built at Boston as a medium clipper.

‘CHARGER’ Built 1856.Wood ship that was wrecked in the Philippines in 1873. She was a typical ship of the period and for 17 years she proved to be a good steady worker.

‘ALHAMBRA’ Built 1859.Wood ship of 1243 Tons. Length; 177.5 ft. Breadth; 33.4 ft. Depth; 25.0 ft. Built at Boston as a medium clipper. 

‘GENERAL McLELLAN’ Built 1862. Wood ship of 1583 Tons. Length; 191 ft. Breadth; 39.3 ft. Depth; 28.6 ft. Built at Thomaston for J.W. Elwell. This ship gained a reputation of being one of the tidiest ships around and many people came to see her in ports around the world. 

‘SEMINOLE’ Built 1865. Wood ship of 1442 Tons. Length; 196.5 ft. Breadth; 41.6 ft. Depth; 25 ft. Built by Maxton and Fish, at Mystic Connetticut , for A.M.Simpson. She was a very pacey clipper and held some good times to her credit while running the ‘Horn 

‘ONIEDA’ Built 1866. Wood ship of 1180 Tons. Length; 186 ft. Breadth; 36 ft. Depth; 23 ft. Built by M.Packard for L.Sloss. Master; Oscar G. Eaton

‘YOSEMITE’ Built 1868. Wood ship of 1104 Tons. Length; 183 ft. Breadth; 37.2 ft. Depth; 23.5 ft. Built at Portsmouth, USA, for Samuel Blair

 ‘SOUTHERN CROSS’ Built 1868. Wood ship of 1086 Tons. Length; 176.8 ft. Breadth; 37.5 ft. Depth; 23.3 ft. Built at Boston for A. H. Brown.

‘ST LUCIE’ Built 1868. Wood ship of 1263 Tons. Length; 194.4 ft. Breadth; 37.4 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built at Bath for I.F.Chapman. She was the second ship named for a saint by her owners who continued the tradition for several more vessels.

‘PRUSSIA’ Built 1869. Wood ship of 1212 Tons. Length; 184.2 ft. Breadth; 36.5 ft. Depth; 23.9 ft. Built at Bath for the Houghton Bothers.

‘ST NICHOLAS’ Built 1869. Wood ship of 1799 Tons. Length; 206.9 ft. Breadth; 42.8 ft. Depth; 29 ft. Built by Chapman and Flint for Flint and Co. Master; Captain Joy. This captain received an award from the British for the rescue of the crew of the Bark ‘Lennox’ which caught fire at sea with a coal cargo in 1882.
 [Timber Drogue]

‘UNDAUNTED’ Built 1869. Wood ship of 1764 Tons. Length; 207.3 ft. Breadth; 41.1 ft. Depth; 27.8 ft. Built by A.E.Sewall For themselves. She was sold to J.E.Stafford in the early 1890’s.

‘CORA’ Built 1869. Wood ship of 1491 Tons. Length; 200.2 ft. Breadth; 39 ft. Depth; 23 ft. Built at Belfast, Maine, for W.H.Burrell.

‘ENOS SOULE’ Built 1869. Wood ship of 1518 Tons. Length; 198.4 ft. Breadth; 38.1 ft. Depth; 18.5 ft. Built at Freeport, Maine, for Enos Soule.

‘JOHN BRYCE’ Built 1869. Wood ship of 1968 Tons. Length; 217 ft. Breadth; 42.2 ft. Depth; 21.7 ft. Built at Thomaston for E.O’Brien.

‘IMPERIAL’ Built 1869. Wood ship of 1331 Tons. Length; 188.7 ft. Breadth; 38 ft. Depth; 23.5 ft. Built at Quincy, Mass, for J.E.Crosby.

‘JOHN C. POTTER’ Built 1869. Wood ship. Length; 216.3 ft. Breadth; 36 ft. Depth; 23 ft. Built by M.Packard for Charles Nelson. Master; Henry G. Curtis.

‘ST JOHN’ Built 1870. Wood ship of 1885 Tons. Length; 216.3 ft. Breadth; 42.7 ft. Depth; 20.4 ft. Built at Bath for J.F.Chapman. Master; Captain J.F.Chapman.

‘CARRIE REED’ Built 1870. Wood ship of 1352 Tons. Length; 193.8 ft. Breadth; 39.4 ft. Depth; 24.9 ft. Built by W. Thompson for themselves and launched at Kennebunkport. .She was sold to the Germans in 1876 and who renamed her ‘Gustave und Oscar’, they sold her to the Chileans and they renamed her ‘Adela’ and she ended her career with that flag.

‘MATCHLESS’ Built 1870. Wood ship of 1198 Tons. Length; app 187 ft. Breadth; app 36 ft. Depth; app 24 ft. Built by Curtis, Smith and Co for James H.Dawes.

‘INDEPENDENCE’ Built 1871. Wood ship of 952 Tons. Length; 165.6 ft. Breadth; 34.2 ft. Depth; 22.9 ft. Built at Boston for Hemingway and Browne. Master; Captain Johnson. This captain had his ship at Peru when a tidal wave struck and the captain’s wife son and two daughters were all drowned. He is said to have turned grey at the shock of his loss.

‘SEA WITCH’ Built 1872. Wood ship of 1288 Tons. Length; 197 ft. Breadth; 37 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built at East Boston for E. Lawrence.

‘CORONDELET’ Built 1872. Wood ship of 1450 Tons. Length; 198.2 ft. Breadth; 40.5 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built at Newcastle, Maine, for Cyrus Walker. She ended her days as a Towing barge at Seattle, Washington and was still there in 1910.

‘TRIUMPHANT’ Built 1873. Wood ship of 2046 Tons. Length; 234.5 ft. Breadth; 43 ft. Depth; 19.1 ft. Built at Quincy, Mass, for Thayes and Lincoln. She was a fast downeaster that went off the register in 1899.

‘EL CAPITAN’ Built 1873. Wood ship of 1494 Tons. Length; 205.3 ft. Breadth; 37.2 ft. Depth; 25.5 ft. Built by E and A. Sewall and Co for themselves. She was later owned by De Groot and Peck. Master; Captain Humphrey. This vessel had crew problems when nine of them became ‘Moon blind’, a condition that seemed to be caused by sleeping under the rays of a full moon. In daylight, the men could see perfectly but at night, they could barely see at all. It was said that after a week their eyes became swollen and inflamed with stye like growths appearing on the eyelids.

NORTHERN LIGHT’ Built 1873. Wood ship of 1795 Tons. Length; 219.7 ft. Breadth; 43.1 ft. Depth; 19 ft. Built at Quincy, Mass, for William Pickney. She was sold to the Norwegians and renamed ‘Mathilde’ to end her days as an oil carrier


‘NEARCHUS’ Built 1873. Wood ship of 1315 Tons. Length; 199.1 ft. Breadth; 37.4 ft. Depth; 24.2 ft. Built by J Currier. She was sold to the Germans about 1890.

 ‘INVINCIBLE’ Built 1873. Wood ship of 1460Tons. Length; 202.4 ft. Breadth; 40 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built at Bath and owned by C.S.Holmes.

‘LOUISIANA’ Built 1873. Wood ship of 1436 Tons. Length; 202.4 ft. Breadth; 40 ft. Depth; 24.4 ft. Built at Bath, USA, for Houghton Brothers. Master; Norman Dunbar.

‘NORTH AMERICAN’ Built 1873. Wood ship of 1583 Tons. Length; 219.6 ft. Breadth; 41 ft. Depth; 24.5 ft. Built at East Boston for M.Hastings.

‘GRANDEE’ Built 1873. Wood ship of 1295 Tons. Length; 193.6 ft. Breadth; 38.5 ft. Depth;23.8 ft. Built at Portsmouth, USA. She was sold to C.H.Mendum and was owned by that firm in 1889.She survived a run in with an iceberg while bound for Melbourne, Victoria. She had her Jibboom torn off and Cutwater and false stem torn away but no other damage was done after the head on collision which gave her an extra load of about ten tons of ice.

‘RODERICK DHU’ Built 1873. Iron ship of 1534 Tons. Length; 257.1 ft. Breadth; 40.2 ft. Depth; 22.8 ft. Built by Mounsey and Foster for the Matson Navigation Company.

‘WAIKATO’ Built 1874. Iron ship of 1007 Tons. Length; 210.5 ft. Breadth; 34.1 ft. Depth; 19.2 ft. Built by in England. She was sold to the Germans who renamed her  'J C Phluger' and then resold to be renamed ‘Coronado’ by the Americans. 

‘SPARTAN’ Built 1874. Wood ship of 1449 Tons. Length; 206.6 ft. Breadth; 42.1 ft. Depth; 24.3 ft. Built by R.E.Jackson for Commodore T.H.Allen and Henry Sears of Boston Captain Isaac N Jackson also bought shares in the ship and he left the ‘Great Admiral’ to take command of her.. She was sold to Henry Cairns in 1878 and he later sold her to P.B.Cornwall of San Francisco. Her master at the time of her Pacific Coast work was Captain Polite. She was stranded in the Hawaiian Islands in 1905.

‘CHARGER’ Built 1874. Wood ship of 1444 Tons. Length; 203.2 ft. Breadth; 39.8 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built by Smith and Townsend for H.Hasting and Co. Master; Captain Henry Merritt. She was sold to the Germans and renamed ‘Louise’ they resold her to do fishery work in Alaska and she got her old name back. She foundered in Karta Bay, Alaska in October 1909.

‘SARATOGA’ Built 1874. Wood ship of 1449 Tons. Length; 207.6 ft. Breadth; 39.2 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built by Pennell. She was sold to S.R.Ulmer and was still owned by them in 1889.

‘HIGHLAND LIGHT’ Built 1874. Wood ship of 1314 Tons. Length; 194.9 ft. Breadth; 38.1 ft. Depth; 24.3 ft. Built at Bath and sold to R.C.Byxbee. They owned her in 1889.

‘TAM O’SHANTER’ II. Built 1875. Wood ship of 1603 Tons. Length; 229.9 ft. Breadth; 41.7 ft. Depth; 24.3 ft. Built by E.C.Soule for themselves. Master; Captain Peabody then Captain Waite. This ship gave the ‘Shenandoah’ a beating that earned her captain 2000 dollars in a bet with his rival captain. ‘Tammy’ won by just three hours on that voyage.

‘HARVESTER’ Built 1875. Wood ship of 1494 Tons. Length; 210.1 ft. Breadth; 39.7 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built by R.A Sewall for themselves. She was sold to A.P.Lorentzen and was still owned by them in 1894.

‘OREGON’ Built 1875. Wood ship of 1431 Tons. Length; 205.6 ft. Breadth; 30.9 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built by W. Rogers at Bath for W.E.Mighell.

‘BOHEMIA’ Built 1875. Wood ship of 1633 Tons. Length; 221.7 ft. Breadth; 40.2 ft. Depth; 25.5 ft. Built at Bath for H.L Houghton. She was sold to the Los Angeles Movie Fleet along with he ships ‘Santa Clara’, ‘LlewellynJ Morse’ and ‘Indiana’ Master; Captain Trask.

‘CONTINENTAL’ Built 1875. Wood ship of 1712 Tons. Length; 220 ft. Breadth; 42.2 ft. Depth; 25.1 ft. Built at Bath for A.C.Peck.

‘REAPER’ Built 1876. Wood ship of 1407 Tons. Length; 211.6 ft. Breadth; 39.2 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built by A.Sewall for themselves. Sewall and Co were long respected as both builders and owners in a tough industry.

‘BELLE OF OREGON’ Built 1876. Wood ship of 1169 Tons. Length; 185.6 ft. Breadth; 38 ft. Depth; 22.5 ft. Built by Goss and Sawyer . She was sold to W.H.Bease and was owned by him in 1894.

‘ARCHER’ Built 1876. Iron ship of 900 Tons. Length; 189.1 ft. Breadth; 32 ft. Depth; 18.7 ft. Built by R.Thompson and Co. Owned by Welch and Co of the USA.

‘THURLAND CASTLE’ Built 1876. Iron ship of 1306 Tons. Length; 226.1 ft. Breadth; 34.8 ft. Depth; 21.5 ft. Built by Harland and Wolf at Belfast for C.Brewer and Co. She was sold and renamed ‘Iolani’ for her later career.

‘SOUTH AMERICAN’ Built 1876. Wood ship of 1762 Tons. Length; 227.5 ft. Breadth; 41.6 ft. Depth; 25.2 ft. Built at Boston for H.Hastings.

‘WANDERING JEW’ Built 1877. Wood ship of 1737 Tons. Length; 219.2 ft. Breadth; 40 ft. Depth; 29 ft. Built by J.Pascal and Camden for Carleton, Norwood and Co.

‘PANAY’ Built 1877. Wood ship of 1190 Tons. Length; 186.7 ft. Breadth; 37 ft. Depth; 23.5 ft. Built at Boston for George Allen.


‘PARAMITA’ Built 1877. Wood ship of 1583 Tons. Length; 216.6 ft. Breadth; 41.3 ft. Depth; 23.1 ft. Built E.C.Soule and Co at Freeport, Maine. Owned by E.C.Soule. Master; Captain H.E Soule Reg; Portland, Maine.


‘PALESTINE’ Built 1877. Wood ship of 1469 Tons. Length; 209.6 ft. Breadth; 40 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built at Bath for Samuel Blair.

‘SEA KING’ Built 1877. Wood ship of 1492 Tons. Length; 210.6 ft. Breadth; 39.4 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built by G.H.Theobald. Sold to W.E.Mighell and was owned by him in 1894.

‘RED CLOUD’. Built 1878. Wood ship of 2058 Tons. Length; 230.5 ft. Breadth; 43.2 ft. Depth; 21.2 ft. Built by G.Thomas for themselves.

‘YORKTOWN’ Built 1878. Wood ship of 1955 Tons. Length; 227 ft. Breadth; 40.5 ft. Depth; 20 ft. Built at Richmond for J.A.Delap.

‘PARAMITA’ Built 1879. Wood ship of 1573 Tons. Length; 216.6 ft. Breadth; 41.3 ft. Depth; 23.1 ft. Built by E.C.Soule for themselves.

‘GEORGE STETSON’ Built 1880.Wood ship of 1845 Tons. Length; 232.9 ft. Breadth; 41.3 ft. Depth; 26.3 ft. Built by A.Hathorne for W.S.Higgins. Bought by Enos Soule and Co of Freeport, Maine. Registered; Portland Maine. Master; Captain H.E.Soule.

‘GLENDON’ Built 1880. Wood ship of 1896 Tons. Length; 235.5 ft. Breadth; 40.6 ft. Depth; 28.4 ft. Built at Kennebunk, Maine, for George W.Rice.

‘IROQUOIS’ Built 1881. Wood ship of 2121 Tons. Length; 239.1 ft. Breadth; 43.6 ft. Depth; 27.9 ft. Built by A Sewall for A.Sewall and Co.

‘LUZON’ Built 1881. Wood ship of 1391 Tons. Length; 205.8 ft. Breadth; 40.7 ft. Depth; 24 ft. Built by Smith and Townsend for De Groot and Peck.

‘TACOMA’ Built 1881. Wood ship of 1739 Tons. Length; 222.2 ft. Breadth; 41 ft. Depth; 26 ft. Built by Goss and Sawyer for C. Davenport.

‘ARABIA’ Built 1881. Wood ship of 2080 Tons. Length; 233.9 ft. Breadth; 43.2 ft. Depth; 27.7 ft. Built at Newport, USA, for Houghton Bothers.


‘BERLIN’ Built 1882. Wood ship of 1634 Tons. Length; 222.5 ft. Breadth; 40 ft. Depth; 24.6 ft. Built at Phippsburg, Maine, for C.V.Minott. 

‘MARION CHILCOTT’ ex ‘Kilbranan’ Built 1882. Iron ship of1738 Tons. Length; 256.4 ft. Breadth; 38.2 ft. Depth; 22.8 ft. Built by Russell and Co. Bought by Matson and Co

‘KENNEBEC’ Built 1883. Wood ship of 2127 Tons. Length; 237.7 ft. Breadth; 43.3 ft. Depth; 27.3 ft. Built by W.Rogers for W.A.Boole.

ST CHARLES’ Built 1883. Wood ship of 1749 Tons. Length; 225.2 ft. Breadth; 41.6 ft. Depth; 16.8 ft. Built at Phippsburg, Maine for C.V.Minott.

‘SANTIAGO’ Built 1885. Iron ship of 979 Tons. Length; 207.6 ft. Breadth; 33.1 ft. Depth; 20 ft. Built by Harland and Wolf at Belfast, Ireland. Bought by Matson Nav, Company.

‘ANDREW WELCH’ Built 1888. Iron ship of 903 Tons. Length; 185.6 ft. Breadth;36.1 ft. Depth; 18.5 ft. Built by Russell and Co for the Matson Navigation Company.

‘ST KATHERINE’ Built 1890. Wood ship of 1264 Tons. Length; 202.8 ft. Breadth; 39.3 ft. Depth; 19.1 ft. Built by J.McDonald at Bath, Maine for Flint and Co. Reg; New York. Master; Captain F.E.Frazier. She was sold to a Salmon packing company of San Francisco and they used her until she was broken up. Owned by Welch of San Francisco and sold to Captain Matson along with several other ships from the same fleet. This took place in 1908 and they became regulars in the Hawaiian trade from San Francisco. [Timber Drogue and Cannery Ship]

‘HELEN BREWER’ Built 1891. Steel ship of 1582 Tons. Length; 247.7 ft. Breadth; 38.9 ft. Depth; 22.5 ft. Built by R.Duncan and Co for C.Brewer and Co.

‘DURBRIDGE’ Built 1892. Steel ship of 2121 Tons. Length; 276.8 ft. Breadth; 42 ft. Depth; 24.2 ft. Built by W.Hamilton and Co. Bought by the Alaska Packers and renamed ‘Star of Falkland’. She sailed on for a few more years under that flag. 

‘OLYMPIC’ Built 1892. Wood ship of 1402 Tons. Length; 224.4 ft. Breadth; 42.1 ft. Depth; 21.3 ft. Built by the New England Ship Building Company for W.H.Besse.

‘HOLLISWOOD’ Built 1893. Wood ship of 1141 Tons. Length; 176 ft. Breadth; 38 ft. Depth; 19.5 ft. Built by J. M. Brooks for E. M. Knight of New York.

‘’EDWARD SEWALL’ Built 1899. Wood ship of 3206 Tons. Length; 332 ft. Breadth; 45.3 ft. Depth; 25.5 ft. Built by A.Sewall for A.Sewall and Co.

‘ASTRAL’ Built 1900. Wood ship of 3262 Tons. Length; 332.3 ft. Breadth; 45.4 ft. Depth; 26 ft. Built by A.Sewall for A.Sewall and Co.

‘ATLAS’ Built 1902. Wood ship of 3381 Tons. Length; 332.4 ft. Breadth; 45.4 ft. Depth; 26.1 ft. Built by A.Sewall for the Standard Oil Company.

The Americans were extremely constructive in their business dealings once the American civil war had ended. Soon they were trading all over the world with the much sought after softwoods of that country. The ‘round the Horn’ trade, was perhaps the most hazardous of all sailing ship voyages. It caused many ships to disappear without trace and Captains were forced to shanghai sailors or even landsmen during the goldrush days. Many a drunken free spirit awoke from his inn-ebriated slumber, to find himself on the high seas, headed for the dreaded Cape. It is said that even a vicar was once belted over the head with a belaying pin while headed home one night. He too, spent the next few months up in the rigging. Shipwrecks were a common item around Cape Horn. Staten Island and Tierra del Fuego bore silent witness to many vessels that were lost on their cold and lonely shores.