The Warren Register of Colonial Tall Ships

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

FIRST QUARTER OF CONVICT REGISTER 1788-1823







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THE BOOK "WILDFLOWER" THE BARBARA CRAWFORD THOMPSON STORY COVERS THE LIFE OF BARBARA THOMPSON, A 12-YEAR-OLD SCOTTISH GIRL WHO WAS TAKEN FROM HER HOME IN SYDNEY IN MARCH 1843 AND WAS FOUND LIVING WITH HEADHUNTERS IN THE TORRES STRAIT ALMOST SEVEN YEARS LATER, IN OCTOBER 1849 BY THE SHIP HMS "RATTLESNAKE" CAPTAIN OWEN STANLEY.

THIS BOOK IS THE RESULT OF 25 YEARS RESEARCH INTO THE LIFE OF BARBARA THOMPSON AND THE FINAL RESULTS ARE AMAZING. THE TRUE [AND CERTIFIED] TALE OF THIS YOUNG SCOTTISH LASSIE'S TRAUMATIC ADVENTURES WILL KEEP YOU ENTHRALLED. FURTHER DETAILS CAN BE FOUND ON THE BLOG TITLED "WILDFLOWER" THE BARBARA CRAWFORD THOMPSON STORY.
        

                       
                                 
Convict ships to Australia
copyright R.J.Warren 2011-2012
In the years following the voyage of discovery by Captain James Cook, it was decided that a settlement should be arranged for the East Coast of New Holland [now Australia]. That convicts should first people the settlement, in the same way Britain had populated their colonies in America and South Africa.

It was also decided that upon Captain Cooks recommendation, the island known as Norfolk Island in the South Pacific, should also be populated and used for its timber and strategic position.    

                                  THE FIRST FLEET   
                                         1787-1788

Assembling for the Muster of the First Fleet.
The number of persons who arrived on the first fleet to Australia has often been confused, due to the addition of those who were merely part of the transportation system and who played no other part in the historic settlement other than getting the convicts ashore. The crews who manned the vessels involved were doing their job and it is not surprising to see them overlooked to a certain extent, while the officers, convicts and marines are reasonably well documented.

Over 1400 persons sailed from England in the first fleet, more than 750 were convicts with 568 male and 191 female convicts being the accepted figure. Many were shifted about from ship to ship during the voyage, which added to the confusion in the official records. The many births, the few deaths and some escapes, did not help matters,

Overall, we can only go by the number given for the convicts who sailed and the names of those who arrived safely. These are provided in the lists to follow. Most of the officers returned to England when their service was ended, many marines settled in the new land with their wives and children and took up the offer of land in the new colony.

The number of convicts loaded aboard each vessel is shown beneath the name of each particular ship, this should but may not tally with the names shown. The health of the convicts became of great importance to Captain Phillip and his surgeons. The arrival of some very dirty and unhealthy prisoners at the holding prisons, convinced Phillip that everything for the voyage must be in order, that all convicts who were to be transported in the first fleet, would be in a fair degree of health.

The transports were laid out in the style of troop transports, hammocks were arranged and the mess had tables and stools. Bulkheads were placed the width of each ship slightly to the rear of the mainmast. This was designed to hold the convicts if an escape was being planned. The bulkheads had loop holes so guns could be fired into any disturbance among the convicts. The bulkheads were also supposed to stop the guards and convicts from having personal or intimate contact, with each other.

All hatches were heavily secured and sentries were on duty at all times during the voyage. The sentries were kept armed while standing on duty and in an incredible oversight, the only weapons that could be fired were the pistols, the Admiralty had forgotten to place ammunition for the rifles among the colonial stores. This may have been a planned move in case of a mass escape but it was more likely an oversight.

Food was rationed to the convicts at the rate of Per Week; Salted Beef; 4 pounds, Salted Pork; 2 pounds; Peas; 2 pounds. Oatmeal: 3 pounds. Butter: 6 ounces. Cheese ¾ pound. Bread [Biscuit] 7 pounds. Vinegar: ½ pint. Other items i.e.: rice, potato soup, and dried fish were at times given to the convicts. Fresh meat and vegetables [while in port] were also added to the diet.

To give the reader some idea of the travel conditions enjoyed by all aboard each of the transports, this is a description of one but really all of them; ‘The ships decks were crowded with wooden pens containing Sheep, Hogs, Goats, Puppies, Kids, Turkeys, Geese, Ducks, Chickens, Pigeons and Cats.

When the fleet arrived at the Cape of Good Hope, they took on more supplies. A bull, a bull calf, seven cows, a stallion, three mares and three colts, 44 more sheep, 4 goats, 28 boars and sows. Added to that cacophony of sound were the many family pets that also came with the officers and marines. Scattered among the pens on deck, were numerous plants and trees. Below decks was exactly the same, except that the convicts were there for much of the time. The noise of fighting and cursing men and women, added to the farmyard orchestra on each vessel, barely needs description.

The officers and marines also took their furniture with them, Surgeon George Wogan brought his piano with him and this he donated to the MacArthur family, before returning to England in 1791.The total tonnage of the combined ships of the first fleet was 3892 tons. Eleven ships that barely weighed the same as a small cargo coaster of today, aboard were some 1487 adult persons made up of 759 convicts and 13 of their children, 252 marines including their wives and children, 20 officials, 210 seamen [Naval] and 233 merchant seamen.

The strange little fleet waddled its way across the oceans and the events that occurred aboard the vessels are much too involved and would require a separate set of books to relate them. Suffice to say that many of the women managed to get pregnant by their jailers and the official staff.

Most of the trouble came from the women and the guards regularly complained about them. The women managed to break through the bulkheads to get to the men waiting on the other side. The men of course probably aided and abetted the women in their efforts, although the penalty for doing this was too harsh for most men to get involved, it did not stop the women.

The total number of those who remained in Australia after the ships departed, were 1030. This number included the Governor, 9 of his staff, the Surveyor General, the Surgeon and four assistants, the Chaplain and his wife and two servants, 211 marines, 46 of their wives and children, 736 convicts and 17 of their children. Thirteen sailors remained in the colony after the ships sailed for England; they had probably become attached to some of the female convicts.

The fleet was headed by the flagship HMS ‘Sirius’ which had been originally named ‘Berwick’ [probably an East Indiaman]. She was built on the Thames River in 1781 and was classed as a sixth rate man-o-war. She carried an armament less than was usually had by a vessel her size, with four six-pounder cannon mounted and six carronades. She also carried ten six-pounders in her hold with ironwork ready for the building of their gun carriages.

As the fleet sailed, the officers noticed that the male convicts seemed much more distressed by being torn away from their loved ones, than the women. Captain Watkin Tench reported that ‘Although the greater number of convicts showed a high degree of satisfaction as the ships began their voyage, many of the men could not suppress their distress. One woman dropped some tears but these were soon wiped away. After that, the accent of sorrow was no longer heard.

Diary of Lieutenant Ralph Clark [first entry] 
May 13th 1787. 5 o’clock in the morning, The ‘Sirius’ made the final signal for the whole fleet to get under way. O gracious God, send that we may put into Plymouth or Torbay on our way down the channel, that I may see our dear and fond affectionate Alicia and our sweet son before I leave them for this long absence. O Almighty God, heed my prayer and grant me this request…. What makes me so happy this day is because that I am in hopes that the fleet will put into Plymouth. Oh my fond heart, lay still for you may be disappointed, I trust in God you will not.
Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Ralph Clark [final entry May 13th 1787.]
The fleet sailed and did not put in at Plymouth and Clark’s final entry for that day was ‘Oh my God, all my hopes are over of seeing my beloved wife and son’. 
Research tips 
* When researching convict ships, the searcher may find a convict muster with a particular ship and as with all subject names in this work, simply press ‘Find’ under ‘Edit’ and type in the subject name. This will take the searcher direct to the ship or person that is being sought.  

HMS ‘SIRIUS’ ex ‘Berwick' Flagship,  Built 1781. 6TH Rate ship. Wood frigate of 540 Tons. Length; App 100 ft. Breadth; 32 ft. Depth; 12 ft. Master; Captain Arthur Phillip [1st Captain and Commander] and Captain John Hunter [2nd Captain]
Officers:
PHILLIP Arthur Captain RN
HUNTER John Captain RN
BRADLEY William 1st Lieut.
MAXWELL George William Lieut.
KING Philip G 2nd Lieut.
HACKING Henry (Q/Master)
PALMER John (Purser)
MILLER Andrew (Commissary)
WOGAN George Bouchier (Surgeon)
JAMISON Thomas (Surgeons mate)
DODD Henry E (Agriculturist)
DeMALIETZ Bernard (Servant)
FREEMAN Thomas (Clerk)
WALKER David (Clerk)
DAVIS John (Coxswain)
HONE Henry (Coxswain)
Midshipmen:
BREWER Henry
DONOVAN Stephen
FERGUSON James
FOWELL Neuton
HARRIS John William
ORMSBY Irwin
RAPER George
SHORTLAND John
WATERHOUSE Henry
HOLT [Midshipman]
And Wife
SEALY [Midshipman, died en-route.]
Seamen:
KELTIE James (Master)
MORTON Micah (Retired Master)
CUNNINGHAM (Mate)
BRYANT (Mate)
SOUTHWELL Daniel (Mate)
BROOKS Thomas (Bosun)
BUCKLEY Stephen (Mate)
GRAVES George (Yeoman)
BRODIE Walter (Armourer)
ROSS Peter (Gunner)
MARA John (Gunners Mate)
LIVINGSTON John (Carpenter)
PARKER Charles (Carpenter)
HAMBLEY William (Carpenter)
WESTBROOK William (Carpenter)
MEREDITH Fredrick (Baker)
DOUGLAS (Cook)
TURNER John (Cook)
WATSON Robert (Sailmaker)
WHITE Peter (Sailmaker)
Mrs. Deborah Brooks (Wife)
ATWELL John
BAIRD David
BELL Jonathan
DAVIS John (Gunnery Mate)
BUDDLE Daniel
BURN Terrance
CANENOUGH Owner
CONWAY John
CALDWELL Joseph
COVENTRY James
 DRUMMOND John


ELLIS Walter
FITZGERALD Henry
FREDERICK John
HENDERSON Robert
HIBBS Peter
JEFFRIES Joseph
MACNEAL John
MITCHELL William
MOORE Edward
MORLEY Robert
PAINTER James
PHILLIPS William
PROCTOR James
REED William
SHINE John
WEBB Thomas
WILSON James

Marines:
ROSS Robert (Master)
FURZER James 1st Lieut.
COLLINS David Lieut.
DAWES William 2nd Lieut.
LONG John 2nd Lieut.
PACKER William (Sgt)
PROCTOR William (Sgt)
PETRIE Henry (Sgt.)
GOWEN John (Corporal)
FREEBORNE Alexander (Drummer)
HUGHES William (Drummer)
REYNOLDS Charles (Drummer)
STEPHENS Robert Mount (Drummer)
WEST John (Drummer)
ANGEL James (Pte)
ASSEL John (Pte)
BACON Samuel (Pte)
BACON Jane (Wife)
BACON Elizabeth (Child)
BATCHELOR John (Pte)
BATES John (Pte)
DUKES Thomas (Pte)
EDMONDSTONE William (Pte)
FLEMMING George (Pte)
GARVIN Thomas (Pte)
GILBORNE Andrew (Pte)
GILBORNE Margaret (Wife)
GOODWIN Philip (Pte)
HALFPENNY Thomas (Pte)
HORITAGE Charles (Pte)
KING Samuel (Pte)
McKEON Patrick (Pte)
OVERTON Edward (Pte)
PARSONS Henry (Pte)
KERRIDGE [Pte]
RADFORD Joseph (Pte)
SCOTT Thomas (Pte)
STANDFIELD Daniel (Pte)
STANDLEY William (Pte)
TARR Isaac (Pte)
TAYLOR Joseph (Pte)
THOMAS Samuel (Pte)
THOMAS Ann (Wife)
TUNKS William (Pte)
TURNER Susannah (Wife)
WILLIAMS James (Pte)
WILLIAMSON John (Pte)
PRATER Charles. Servant to Lieutenant Collins
Possible convict.
Johnson George [Aide de Camp per Captain Phillip.]
Clark Zachariah [Provost]
Smith James [Peace Officer]
HOSPITAL STAFF.
Considen Denis.
Arndell Thomas.
Balmain William.
SIRIUS’ carried a complement of 160 men and although some of her number are not shown here, it is thought that they are among the supplementary listed marines and seamen.
 
BORROWDALE’ Store Ship Built at Sunderland in 1785. 3 mast ship of 272 Tons Length: approx. 90ft Breadth: approx. 27ft. Depth: approx. 17 ft. Master: Captain Hobson Readthorn. This vessel would have carried a crew of approximately 30 men; she would also have shipped a guard of at least four marines.

Seamen:
BROWN (Mate)REID (Mate)WILLIAMS Richard (Seamen) 

FISHBURN’ Store Ship Built at Whitby in 1780. She was a three mast square-rigged ship of 278 Ton Length: approx. 110ft Breadth: approx. 30ft. Depth: approx. 18 ft. Master: Brown Robert. This vessel would have also carrier a crew of approximately 30 men and at least four marines. [Carried one convict]
Seamen:
ROBINSON Andrew (Cook)                                                                                                                DEAN George (Convict)The Bosun (Unnamed) - Died at Storm Bay 1-1-1788. 

GOLDEN GROVE’ Store Ship, Built at Whitby in 1780.She was a three mast ship of 375 Tons Length: 110ft Breadth: approx. 30ft. Depth; App 18 ft. Master; Captain Sharpe [Christian name not known] She would have carried a crew of thirty or more with at least four marine guards.
Seamen:
HART (Mate)
MOORE Stephen (Steward)
JOHNSON Mary (Wife)
BARNES Samuel (Convict Sgt.)
SIMMS (Seaman)
None of the Storeships correctly list crewmen in the various documents on file. The rest of the crewmen are probably placed among the supplementary lists. Thirty or more crew would have manned each of the storeships. The reason for crews not being well documented would have been because these men were not really considered part of the first penal settlement. They were to sail back to England and resume their normal work once the convicts had been landed.

ALEXANDER’ Built 1783. Wood barque of 452 Tons. Length: 114 ft. Breadth: 31 ft. Depth: app 18 ft. Built at Hull, Yorkshire. Master: Duncan Sinclair. [Carried 195 male convicts]
Officers:
SHORTLAND John Lieut. RN
CLARKE Zachariah (Agent)
BALMAIN William (Surgeon)
JOHNSTONE John Lieut. Marines
MAILAND Shairpe James 1st Lieut.
KNIGHT Isaac (Sgt.)
SINCLAIR Duncan (Master)
LONG William Aston (Mate)
SHORTLAND Thomas George (2nd Mate)
DONOVAN 2nd Mate

SEAMEN
TRIMMINGS Thomas (Steward)
BAILEY Alexander (Seaman)
CLAY Charles (Seaman)
HEDLEY Anthony (Seaman)
DICKSON William Archer (Cabin Boy)
FRAZER Thomas (Cabin Boy)
KELLY John (Seaman)
LEWIS John (Seaman)
RANSON Robert (Seaman)
STOCKELL James (Seaman)
WATERS Edward (Seaman)
WAUGH William (Seaman)
WINTER John (Cabin Boy)
ARCHER Isaac (Marine Pte)
BISHOP Elias (Marine Pte)
LEWIS John (Marine Pte)

Convicts: – Male Only.
ABLE Robert
ALLEN John
ALLEN William
BAILS Robert
BANNISTER George
BARFORD John
BARNES Stephen
BARNETT Henry
BARSBY George
BARTLETT James
BIRD James
BIRD Samuel
BLACKHALL William
BOND Peter
BRADLEY James
BRINDLEY John
BROUGH William
BROWN James
BURLEIGH James
BUTCHER Samuel
CARVER Joseph
CESAR John
CHIELDS William
CLOUGH Richard
CONNELLY William
CORDEN James
CORMICK Edward
CROPPER John
CROSS John
CROWDER Thomas
DAVIS Aaron
DAVIS Edward
DAVIS Samuel
DAVIS William
DAY Richard
DAY Samuel
DENISON Barnaby
DENISON Michael
DEVINE Philip
DICKSON Thomas
DOUGLAS William
DRING William
DYER Leonard
EARLE William
EDMUNDS William
EGGLESTON George
EGGLESTON William
ELLAM Peter
EVERETT John
FILLESEY Thomas
FOWKES Francis
FRANCIS William
FREEMAN James
GEERING Thomas
GLENTON Thomas
GLOSTER William
GORDON Daniel
GRAY Charles
GREEN John
GREENWELL Nicholas
GUEST George
GUNTHER William
HAINES Joseph
HARDING William
HARRIS William
HART John
HARTLEY John
HATCH John
HATCHER John
HATFIELD William
HATHERWAY Henry
HAWELL Thomas
HAWKES Richard
HAYES Dennis
HEADING James
HEADINGTON Thomas
HILL John
HINDLE Ottiwell
HOLLISTER Job
HUGHES Hugh
JACKSON William
JEFFRIES John
JEFFRIES Robert
JENKINS Robert
JEPP John
HOHNSON Charles
JONES Edward
JONES Francis
JONES Thomas
KELLY Thomas
KIDNEY Thomas
KILBY William
KNOWLER John
LEMON Isaac
LOCKLEY John
LONG Joseph
LYNCH Humphrey
McDONALD Alexander
McDONNAUGH James
MacINTYRE John
McLAUGHLIN Charles
McLEAN Francis
McLEAN Thomas
MANSFIELD John
MARINER William
MARROTT John
MARTIN John
MARTIN Stephen
MATSON Thomas
MAY Richard
MIDGLEY Samuel
MILTON Charles
MORGAN Richard
MORRIS Peter
MOWBRAY John +
MULLOCK Jason
MURPHY William
NETTLETON Robert
OGDEN James
OKEY William
OPLEY Peter
ORFORD Thomas
OWLES John
PAGE Paul
PALMER John H +
PANE William
PARKER John
PARISH William
PARR William
PERROTT Edward B
PARRY Edward +
PETRIE John
PEYTON Samuel
PLATT William
POPE David
POTTER William
POWER John
PRICE James
PRICE John
PRIOR Thomas
RADFORD William
RANDALL John
REPEAT Charles
RICHARDS James
RICHARDSON Hardwicke
RICHARDSON James
RICHARDSON William
RISBY Edward
ROBERTS John
ROBINSON George
ROBINSON Joseph
RODGERS Daniel +
RODGERS Isaac +
ROPE Anthony
SALTMARSH William
SANDERSON Thomas
SANDS William +
SCATTERGOOD Robert
SHARPE George
SHAW Joseph
SILVERTHORN John
SMART Daniel
SMART Richard +
SMITH Thomas
SMITH William
STANDLEY William
STOGDELL John
STOKA John
STONE Charles
STONE Henry
STONE Martin +
STOW James
STRONG James
SUMMERS John
TAYLOR Joshua
THOMAS James
THOMPSON William
TILLEY Thomas
TROTTER Joseph
TUNMINS Thomas
TURNER Ralph +
TWYNEHAM William +
TYRRELL William
USHER John
VARNDELL Edward
WAGER Benjamin
WARD John +
WATERHOUSE William
WATSON John
WEST Benjamin
WELCH James
WELCH John
WHEELER Samuel
WHITING William
WHITAKER George
WILCOCKS Samuel
WILTON William +
WILSON John
WILSON Peter
WOOD George
WRIGHT Thomas
YOUNG John
+ Died after embarkation or while en-route


LADY PENRYHN’ Built 1786. Wood ship of 333 Tons. Length: 103 ft. Breadth: 27 ft. Depth: app 19 ft. Built London. Master: William Compton Sever.
Transport. [Carried 101 female convicts]

Officers:
ANSTIS Nicholas (Mate)
SQUIRES 2nd Mate
BALL 3rd Mate
HOLMES Robert 4th Mate
GUNTHORPE William (Bosun)
SCRIVEN Philip (Foremastman)
SISSON (Cook)
YOUNG William (Steward)
BOWES-SMYTHE (Surgeon)
ALTREE John Turnpenny (Asst. Surgeon)
SMITH James (Passenger)
WATTS John Lieut. RN (Passenger)
CRUDIS William (Quartermaster)
DOWNEY Joseph (Quartermaster)
MARSHALL William (Quartermaster)
ROACH Charles (Quartermaster)
Seamen:
BENTLEY Joshua
BRUCE
CLEMENTS
CURTIS William
DAWSON Richard
DEANE Edward
DUNCAN David
FISHER John
FLOAN [Sloan?]Richard
HARRISON Joseph (Cabin boy)
HENDERSON William
HILL Henry (deserted at Rio de Janeiro)
MORGAN William
BODWICK William
THEAKSON Joseph
TWISS William
Marines:
CAMPBELL James (Captain)
CAMPBELL James [Child]
JOHNSTON George (1st Lieut.)
COLLINS William (Lieut.)
COLETHREAD John (Pte)
COLETHREAD James [Child]
DUNN George (Pte)
ROSS John A (Pte)

Convicts:
ABELL Mary
TILLEY William (Infant in care)
ABRAHAMS Ester
ABRAHAMS Rosanna (Infant)
ADAMS Mary
ALLEN Mary
ALLEN Thomason
ANDERSON Elizabeth
ANDERSON Frances
BAKER Martha
BECKFORD Elizabeth +
BELLAMY Sarah
BELLAMY Joseph (Infant)
BIRD Elizabeth
BLADES Margaret
BOLTON Mary
BRAND Lucy
BRANHAM Mary
BRANHAM John (Infant)
BRUCE Elizabeth
BOURNE Margaret
BURDO Sarah
BURKITT Patience
BURLEIGH Elizabeth
BURLEIGH John (Infant)
CARROLL Mary
COLLEY Elizabeth
COLLPITTS Anne
CONNOR Mary
COOKE Charlotte
COCKRAN Mary
COOPER Mary
CREEK Jane
DALTON Elizabeth
DAVIDSON Rebecca
DAVIS Ann
DAVIS Frances
DAVIS Mary
DAVIS Sarah
DAWSON Margaret
DICKENSON Mary
DUTTON Ann
DICKS Mary
EATON Martha
EVANS Elizabeth
FINN Mary
FINN Daniel (Infant)
FITZGERALD Elizabeth
FOWLES Ann
FOWLES Margaret
FOWLES Mary (Infant)
GAMBOL Mary
GASCOYNE Olivia
GEORGE Ann
GREEN Ann
GREENWOOD Mary
HALL Elizabeth
HALL Sarah
HAMILTON Maria
HANDLAND Dorothy
HARRISON Mary
HART Catherine
HAYWARD Elizabeth
HENDERSON Margaret
HENRY Catherine
HILL Mary
HIPSLEY Elizabeth
HOFFMAN Mary Ann
HOWARD Ester
HUFFNELL Susannah
HUMPHRIES Mary
INETT Ann
JACKSON Mary
LANGLEY Jane
LANGLEY Philip (Infant)
SHEWRING Henrietta (Infant in care)
LAWRENCE Mary
LAWSON Isabella
LEE Elizabeth
LEONARD Elizabeth
LEVI Amelia
LEWIS Sophia
LOCK Elizabeth
LOVE Mary
McCABE Eleanor
McCABE Charles (Infant)
MARSHALL Elizabeth
MARSHALL Mary
MARTIN Ann
MARTIN Maria
MITCHELL Mary
MITCHELL Thomas (Infant)
MORTON Ann
MORTON Joshua (Infant)
MOULTON Mary
MULLINS Hannah
MULLINS Mary (Child)
NEEDHAM Elizabeth
NORTON Phoebe
OSBORNE Elizabeth
PARKER Mary
PARKINSON Elizabeth +
PARKINSON Edward (Child)
PARRY Sarah
PARTRIDGE Sarah
PILES Sarah
POWELL Ann
PURDUE Sarah
RAWSON Isabella
READ Ann
ROBERTS Ester
SANDLIN Ann
SLATER Mary
SMITH Ann
SLATER Mary
SMITH Ann
SMITH Edward (Infant)
SMITH Mary
SPRIGMORE Charlotte
SPRINGHAM Mary
THORNTON Ann
TRIPPETT Susannah
TURNER Mary
TWYFIELD Ann
WADE Ann
WARD Ann
WILLIAMS Mary
WRIGHT Ann +
YATES Ann
YATES Joseph (Infant) was the
son of THEAKSON Joseph Marine 

PRINCE OF WALES’ Transport, Built on the Thames River in 1786. She was a three mast ship of 335 Tons Length: 103ft Breadth: 29.4 ft. Depth; approx. 21 ft. Master: John Mason [She carried 49 female convicts and one male convict
 Officers: 
ALT Augustus (Surveyor)
TIMMINS Thomas 1st Lieut. (Marines)
Seamen:
HOSBORN Robert
MOORE Samuel
NELSON (Cook)
PORTER James (Cabin boy)
YORGINSEN Yorgen +

Marines:
SCOTT James (Sergeant)
SCOTT June (Wife)
SCOTT Elizabeth (Child)
NASH William (Pte)
NASH Marie (Wife)
WRIGHT Henry (Pte)
WRIGHT Ann (Wife)
WRIGHT Mary Ann (Child)
WHITTLE Thomas (Drummer)
WHITTLE Elizabeth (Wife)
WHITTLE Thomas (Child)
WHITTLE (Infant born 26-1-1788)


Convicts:
ALLEN Susannah
AULT Sarah
BALDWIN Ruth
BEDDINGFIELD Martha
BINGHAM Elizabeth
BLANCHARD Susannah
BONNER Jane +
BOULTON Rebecca
DARNELL Margaret
DIXON Mary
DUNDASS Jane
ELLAM Deborah
FARMER Ann
FIELD Jane
FLARTY Phoebe
FORBES Ann
GIBBS Susannah
GREEN Mary
GRIFFITHS Thomas
GROVES Mary
HAYLOCK Caroline
HARRIS Mary
HERBERT Jane
HOLLOGIN Elizabeth
HUGHES Frances Ann
IRVINE John (Asst. to Surgeon)
JOHNSON Catherine
JOHNSON Mary
KENNEDY Martha
LONG Mary
MARRIOT Jane
MATHER Ann
MITHCRAFT Mary
MUNRO Letitia
PARSLEY Ann
PINDER Mary
PIPKIN Elizabeth
REDCHESTER Ellen
ROLT Mary
SCOTT Elizabeth
SMITH Ann
SMITH Catherine
SPENCE Mary
TAURA Laura
TAYLOR Sarah
THOMAS Elizabeth
WARBURTON Ann
WAINWRIGHT Ellen
WILLIAMS Frances
YOUNGSON Elizabeth
YOUNGSON George. 

SCARBOROUGH’ Built 1782. Wood barque of 430 Tons. Length: 111 ft. Breadth: 30 ft. Depth: app 21 ft. Built at Scarborough. Master: John Marshall.
Transport. [Carried 208 male convicts]
OFFICERS;
CHAFFEY George (Mate)
DAWSON (Mate)
WILSON Thomas (2nd Mate)
McCARTHY Charles (Bosun)
CONSIDEN Dennis (Surgeon)
1 New Foundland dog "Hector"

SEAMEN:
BURKLEY Michael
HAYES J
FAWLEY John
MASON Thomas
McCARTHY Charles
MEAD William
THOMPSON William

MARINES:
SHEA John (Captain)
KELLOW (1st Lieut.)
MAXWELL James (1st Lieut.)
DAVEY Thomas (1st Lieut.)
MORRISON (Lieut.)
HUME John (Sgt.)
HUME Sarah (Wife)
BROWN John (Pte)
BULLMORE Thomas (Pte)
CLAYTON John (Pte)
DARGIN Peter (Pte)
DOUGLAS William (Pte)
EASTY John (Pte)
GAMMON John (Pte)
GOODALL William (Pte)
HAYNES Luke (Pte)
HUNT Joseph (Pte)
JONES John (Pte)
JOHNES William S (Pte)
LUCAS Thomas (Pte)
REDMAN Michael (Pte)
REDMAN Elizabeth (Wife)
REDMAN James (Child)
SEE James (Pte)

CONVICTS:
ABRAMS Henry
ADMAS [Adams?] John
AGLEY Richard
ALLEN Charles
ANDERSON John
ATKINSON George
AYNERS John
AYERS John
BALDING William
BARLAND George
BELL William
BELLET Jacob
BENEAR Samuel
BLAKE Francis
BLUNT William
BOGGIS William
BOYLE John
BRADBURY William
BRADLEY James
BROWN Thomas
BRYANT Thomas
BURN Peter
BURNE James
BUTLER William
CAMPBELL George
CARNEY John
CARTY Francis
CASTLE James
CHADWICK Thomas
CLARK John
CLARK William
CLEMENTS Thomas
COLE William
COLLIER Richard
COLLING Joseph
CONELLY Cornelius
CONNOLLY William
COX John M
CROSS William
CUCKOW William
CUDLIP Jacob
CULLEN James B
CULLYHORN John
CUNNINGHAM Edward
DALEY James
DANIELLS Daniel
DAVIDSON John
DAVIS James
DISCALL Timothy
DOWLAND Ferdinand
DUNNAGE Joseph
EBDEN Thomas
ECCLES Thomas
ELLIOT William
ENGLISH Nicholas
EVERINGHAM Matthew J
FARRELL Phillip
PENTUM Benjamin
FLOYD John
FORRESTER John
FORRESTER Robert
FRANCISCO George
FRY George
GARDNER Francis
GARTH Edward
GOODWIN Andrew
HARPER Joshua
HARRIS John
HARRISON Joseph
HART John
HATTOM Joseph
HAYES John
HAYTON George
HERBERT John
HILL John
HILL Thomas
HOGG William
HOLLOWAY James
HOLMES William
HOWARD John
HOWARD Thomas
HUBBARD William
HUGHES John
HUMPHREY Edward
HURLEY Jeremiah
HYLIDS Thomas
INGLE Joseph
JACOBS David
JACOBS John
JOHNS Stephen
JOHNSON William
JOSEPHS Thomas
KEELING John
KILPACK David
KIMBERLEY Edward
KING John
LANE Richard
LANE William
LANKEY David
LAWRELL John
LEARY John
LEVY Joseph
LIST George
LUCAS Nathaniel
McLEAN Edward
MAGEE Christopher
MARNEY William
MARSHALL Joseph
MESSIAH Jacob
MIDDLETON Richard
MILES Edward
MILLER Charles
MOBBS Samuel
MOLLANDS John
MOORE William
MORAN John
MORGAN Robert
MORRISBY James
MOULD William
MOYLE Edward
NEAL John
NEWLANDS John
NICHOLLS John
NUNN Robert
NURSE John
OWEN John
PARIS Peter
PARTRIDGE Richard
PEAT Charles
PEAULET James
PECK Joshua
PERCIVAL Richard
PETTITT John
PHILLIMORE Richard
PHILLIPS Richard
PONTIE John
RAMSEY John
RAYMOND George
READ William
REARDON Bartholomew
RICHARDS David
RICHARDS James
RICHARDS John
RICHARDSON John
RICHARDSON Samuel
RICKSON William
ROBERTS William
ROBINSON George
ROMAIN John
ROWE John
ROWE William
RUFFLER John
RUGLASS John
RUSSELL John
SAMPSON Peter
SAXBY William
SELSHIRE Samuel
SEYMOUR John
SHEARS James
SHORE John
SMITH Edward
SMITH James
SMITH Thomas
SMITH William
SNALEHAM William
SPARKS Henry
STUART James
TEAGUE Cornelius
THOMAS James
THOMAS John
THOMPSON James
THOMPSON William
TILL Thomas
TODD Nicholas
TURNER John
TUSO Joseph
VINCENT Henry
WALBOURNE James
WALKER John
WALSH William
WARREN John
WELSH John
WESTWOOD John
WHITE James
WHITTON Edward
WILLIAMS James
WILLIAMS John
WILLIAMS Robert
WILSON Charles
WOODCOCK Peter
WOODHAM Samuel
WORSDELL William
WRIGHT Benjamin
WRIGHT James
WRIGHT Joseph
WRIGHT William
YOUNG Simon

CHARLOTTE’ Built 1784. Wood barque of 338 Tons. Built on the Thames River. Length: 105 ft. Breadth: 28 ft. Depth: app: 16 ft. Two-deck ship with square stern. Master: Thomas Gilbert. Transport. [Carried 88 male and 20 female convicts]

Officers
WHITE John (Surgeon general)
TENCH Watkins (Captain Marines)

Seamen:
LAVENDER George (Bosun)
AIMSSEN Joseph
RIDDELL John
RIMMER Joseph
STOREY John
SMITH Edward

Marines:
CRESWELL John (1st Lieut.)
POULDEN John (1st Lieut.)
McMANUS James (Pte)
CONNELL Patrick (Pte)
MITCHELL William (Pte)
TYNAN Thomas (Pte)
COOK Benjamin (Drum Major)
COOK Mary (Wife)
CRESWELL Susan (Wife)

Convicts:
ACRES Thomas
ANDERSON Frances
ANDERSON John
ARSCOTT John
BAKER Thomas
BALL John
BARRETT Thomas
BARSBY Samuel
BASON Elizabeth
BATELY Walton
BAYLEY James
BAZLEY John
BEATHERHORN William
BLOODWORTH James
BOND William
BRADFORD John
BRAUND Mary
BRANNEGAN James
BREWER William
BRUCE Robert
BROWN Thomas
BROWN William
BRYANT John
BRYANT William
BUCKLEY Joseph
BURRIDGE Samuel
CAREY Ann
CHAAF William
CHANIN Edward +
CHINERY Samuel
CHURCH William
CLARKE John +
CLEAVER Mary
COFFIN John
COLE Elizabeth
COLEMAN Ishmael +
COOMB Ann
COFF James
COX James
CREAMER Peter
CUSS John
FERGUSON John
FITZGERALD Jane
FOYLE William
FRAZIER William
GARLAND Francis
GOULD John
HADON John
HALL John
HALL Joseph
HAMLIN William
HERBERT John
HITT William
HOLLAND William
HORTOP Joseph
HUMPHREY Henry
JACKSON Hannah
JENKINS William
JOHNSON Edward
JONES John
JONES Margaret
JONES Jenny (Child)
LARNE James
LIGHTFOOT Samuel
LEGG George
LIMEBURNER John
LIMPUS Thomas
LYNCH Ann
MAJOR John
MARTIN Abraham
MARTIN Thomas
MARTYN James
MEECH Jane
MITCHELL Nathaniel
MORTIMERE John
MORTIMORE Noah
MULLETT Stephen
O'CRAFT John
PAGETT Joseph
PHILLIPS Mary
PIGOTT Samuel
POOLE Jane
POWER William
PRIOR Catherine
RICE John
ROACH Henry
ROBINSON William
RUSE James
RUTH Robert
SHEPHARD Mary
SMALL John
SMITH Ann
SMITH Edward
SMITH Hannah
SMITH John
SMITH William
SPENCER Daniel
SQUIRES James
STEPHENS John M
STUART Margaret
TRACE John
UNDERWOOD James
VICKERY William
WADDICOMBE Richard
WATSON Thomas
WESTLOCKE Edward
WICKHAM Mary
WILCOX Richard
WILLIAMS John
WOOLCOT John

FRIENDSHIP’. Built 1784 at Scarborough. Wood two-mast Brig or ‘Snow’ of 278 Tons. Length: 96ft. Breadth: 27ft. Depth: approx. 16 ft. [carried 76 male and 21 female convicts] Master: Francis Walton.

Officers
LAURENCE Robert (Mate)
VALLANCE Patrick (2nd Mate) +
ARNDELL Thomas (Surgeon)
MEREDITH James (CPN Marines)
CLARKE Ralph (2nd Lieut.)
FADDY William (2nd Lieut.)
Marines:
BROWING William
CHIPP Thomas
CUSLEY Benjamin
ELLIS William
FISHBORNE Andrew
FOLLY John
GRIFFITHS John
ROWDEN Thomas
WILLIAMS Thomas

Seamen:
BARNES Robert (Bosun)
BRUCE William (Cook)
HERN William (Steward)
ALLEN Robert
ALLEN William
COCKRAN Robert
CRAVEN James
Du HEG Cornelius
GEORGE Robert
HAWK John
LEWIS Thomas
MORRIS John
SANDELL Richard
SMITH Robert
TRIMBY James

Convicts:
BARBER Elizabeth
BARNETT Daniel
BAUGHAN John
BAYLIS John
BEARDSLEY Ann
BENNETT John
BEST John
BISHOP Joseph
BRAND Curtis
BRICE William
BRYANT Michael
BURN Peter
BUSLEY John
CARTWRIGHT Richard
CLARKE Elizabeth
CLEAR George
CUPWELL Susannah
DAVIS Richard
DELANY Patrick +
DODDING James
DUDGEON Elizabeth
EARLY Rachael
EDWARDS William
ELLIOTT James
EVANS William
FAIRLY William
FENDLOW John
FIELD William
FLYN Edward
GOUGH Susannah
GRACE James
GRANGER Charles
GREEN Hannah
GREEN William (Child)
HACKNEY Elizabeth
HALL Margaret
HANDY Cooper
HARRIS William
HART Frances
HART John (Child)
HARVEY Elizabeth
HAYNES William
HILL John
HILL Thomas
HOLMES Jonathon
HOLMES Susannah
HUDSON Thomas
HUGHES Thomas
HUSSEY James
IVES James
JAMESON James
JONES Richard
JONES William
JONES Thomas
KABLE Henry Snr
LAMBERT John
LEARY Jeremiah
LEGROVE Stephen
LOAD John
LOVELL Henry
McCORMACK Mary
McDEED Richard
McGRATH Richard
MACKY James
McNAMARA William
MASON Elizabeth
MASSEY James
MORLEY Joseph
MURPHY James
NEAL James
OLDFIELD Isabelle
OWEN Thomas
PATRICK John
PENNY John
PERKINS Edward
PRITCHARD Thomas
PUGH Edward
PUGH Elizabeth
PULLEY Elizabeth
RONALD Andrew
ROUSE Walton
RYAN John
SIDAWAY Robert
SPENCE John
STRETCH Thomas
TAYLOR Henry
TENCHALL James
TUCKER Moses
TURNER John
TWYFIELD roger
WARE Charlotte
WATKINS Mary
WILLIAMS Daniel
WISEHAMMER John
WOOD Mark
WOODCOCK Francis
YARDLEY Thomas 
HMS ’SUPPLY’ Built c1760 Wood two mast sloop of 170 Tons. Length; app: 80 ft. Breadth: app: 25 ft. Depth: app; 12ft. Master: David Blackburn. Armed Tender. 
BALL Henry L (Lieut. RN) Commander of "Supply" 
JAY Richard (Quarter master
CALLAM James (Surgeon)
Marines:
ROGERS James (Pte)
TOMLINSON William (Pte)

Convict:
McCLELLAN Charles

Seamen:
AIKEN James
BRAYDON John
DAVIS James
FREDERICK John
GAWLER Robert
GOULD Peter (Bosun)
McDONALD William
MILES John
MOONEY Richard
MORLEY Roger (Weaver)
REED Robert (Carpenter)
ROBINSON John
SAWER J
SCOTT John
TEBREE Joseph
WILLIAMS James

Midshipmen:
BARROW
LAWSON
The personnel list shown as crew of the HMS ‘Supply’ is not complete. Even though ‘Supply’ was a brig, she would have had a crew of between twenty and thirty men. A list of seamen and marines that were not listed to a particular ship are shown below.
Supplementary List
Marine Officers:
SHORT John (Lieut.)

Sergeants:
BAKER William
CHAMPION Edward
CLAYFIELD William
CLINCH Richard
DIVAN Edward
KENNEDY John
PERRY William
STEWART Peter
YOUNG Thomas

Corporals:
ANDERSON Alexander
BAGLEY James
BREXLEY Charles
CHAPMAN Thomas
CONNOR Martin
GOUGH Thomas
NICHOLAS Richard
PLOWMAN James
SMITH Thomas
WINSTEAD John

Marine Privates:
ASKY Richard
BAGNALL Ralph
BAKER James
BARRISFORD John
BAXTER William
BISHOP Thomas
BRAMAGE Thomas
BRAMWELL Thomas
BRANNON John
BROUGH Ralph
BROWN James
BROWN John
BULL William
CABLE William
CARVER John
CHADWICK William
CHESLETT George
CHEW John
CLEMENTS Henry
COTTRELL Thomas
COWARD Joshua
DAVIS John
DEW William
DINGER Edward
DOUGHERTY Arthur
DOWLAN William
DRIGLAS William
DYKES Richard
ESCOTT John
EVANS Humphrey
GILBERT Stephen
GODFREY William
GRANT James
GREEN Charles
HAILEY James
HAILEY John
HALLAM William
HAND Abraham
HARMSWORTH Thomas
HARP Thomas
HARPER Joseph
HASWELL Thomas
HAYES John
HILL Thomas
HOWELL John
HURDLE James
HURST Mark
JACKSON Thomas
JONES Thomas
KENNEDY John
King William
KIRBY James
KNIGHT Richard
LEWIS Joseph
LYNCH Mortimer
McAVENAUGH Bartholomew
McCALDER Joseph
McCANN John
McCARTHY John
McDONALD Alexander
MANNING James
MAPP James
MAPP John
MARTIN Thomas
MASON William
MEE Francis
MUNDAY John
NATION GABRIEL
NEVITT Thomas
NORRIS William
O'BRIEN Thomas
ODGERS Edward
PHILLIPS THOMAS
PUGH John
REDMOND James
REDMOND John
REED Anthony
REILEY James
RICE John
RICHARDS Laurence
ROBERTS John
ROBERTS William
ROSSER Henry
RUSSELL John
RYAN Robert
SCULLY Thomas
SEEDHOUSE William
SIMMONS William
SMITH William
SPENCER Thomas
STOULTON William
STRONG Walter
SWINERTON Thomas
THATCHER John
THOMAS Edward
THOMPSON Robert
TOLAN Michael
WALL William
WATTS John
WESTBROOK William
WHERRIT James
WHITE James
WILKINS John
WILLMORE Robert
WINWOOD George
WISE James
WOODHOUSE Thomas
WOODS John
WRIGHT Mathew 
Marine wives and children.
BAGLEY Sarah
BAGLEY Marie (Child)
BARRISFORD Hannah
BROWN Elizabeth
CHAPMAN Janet
CAPHMAN Elizabeth (Child)
CLAYFIELD Rachel
DAVIS Martha
DAVIS Jane (Child)
DIVAN Jane
DIVAN Edward (Child)
DINGER Elizabeth
DOUGHERTY Judah
DOUGHERTY Daniel (Child)
GOUGH Joanna
GOUGH (COX) Joseph
HARMSWORTH Alice
HARMWORTH Ann (Child)
JACKSON Agnes
KENNEDY Mary
MUNDAY Ann
MUNDAY Edward
PERFECT Sarah
PERFECT James
PERRY Ann
RICHARDS Mary
RUSSELL Elizabeth
RUSSELL Mary (Child)
RUSSELL Thomas (Child)
STEWART Margaret
STEWART John (Child)
STEWART Robert (Child)
YOUNG Elizabeth
YOUNG John (Child)
YOUNG Thomas (Child)

Stores, Livestock and Hardware:
One Tent (per Gov. Philip)
One Printing Press
One set type fonts
700 Felling Axes
700 Hatchets
700 Grubbing Hoes
700 West Indian Hoes
700 Garden Hoes
700 Iron Shovels
700 Steel Spades
10 Forges
700 Helves (for felling axes)
747,000 Nails
100 pair Hinges and Hooks
10 sets Coopers tools
40 Corn Mills
40 Wheat Barrows
12 Ploughs
30 Grindstones
330 Iron Pots
6 Carts
4 Timber Carriages
14 Chains for Timber Carriages
5448 Squares of Crown Glass
200 Canvas Beds
14 Fishing Nets
175 Claw Hammers
175 Steel Hand Saws
80 Carpenters Axes
20 Shipwrights Adzes
63 Chaldrons of Coal
140 Augers
700 Gimlets
504 Saw Files
300 Chisels
100 Scissors
30 Pincers
30 Box Rules
100 Planes Measures
50 Pickaxes
50 Helves for Pickaxes
700 Wooden Bowls
700 Platters (for wooden bowls)
6 Butchers Knives
5 Sets of Blacksmith Tools
10 Blacksmiths Bellows
20 Pit Saws
700 Clasp Knives
50 tin-plates
60 Padlocks
50 Hayforks
42 Splitting Wedges
8000 Fish Hooks
3 dozen Flat Iron Candlesticks
3 Snuffers
24 Spinning Wheels
18 Spinning Brasses
1 Set Candle Making Equipment
1 dozen Tin Saucepans
48 dozen Fishing Lines
8 dozen Pounds of Sewing Twine
10,000 Bricks
12 Brick Moulds
38 Masons Chisels
12 Ox Bowls
6 Harpoons
12 Lances
Shoe Leather
40 Tents for Women Convicts
6 Bundles of Ridge Poles
11 Bundles of Stand Poles
2 Chests of Pins and Mallets

Apparel:
300 Pairs Women’s Shoes
Mill Spindles with Crosses
2 Cases of Mill Bills and Picks
1 Case of Mill Brashes
589 Women’s Petticoats
606 Women’s Jackets
121 Women’s Caps
327 Pairs of Women’s Stockings
381 Women’s Shifts
250 Women’s Handkerchiefs
Course Thread (blue and white) with Needles
Marines Uniforms
140 Women’s Hats
5440 Drawers
2760 Woolen Jackets
27 dozen Combs
3 Flax Dresser Brushes

Stores:
800 Pound Coarse Sugar
190 Pounds Indian Sago
1 Small Cask of Raisins
6 Pounds of Spices
30 Hogsheads of Vinegar
448 Barrels of Flour
60 Bushels of Seed Wheat
20 Bushels Seed Barley
10 Bushels Indian Seed Coriander
12 Baskets of Garden Seed
Quantity Fig Trees
Quantity Bamboo’s
Quantity Sugarcane
Quantity Quinces
Quantity Apples
Quantity Pears
Quantity Strawberries
Quantity Oak Trees
Quantity Myrtle Trees
135 Tierces Beef
165 Tierces Pork
50 Puncheons Bread
118 Casks of Pease
110 Firkins of Butter
8 Bram of Rice
5 Puncheons of Rum
300 Gallons of Brandy
15 Tons of Drinking Water
5 Casks of Oatmeal
12 Bags of Rice

Seed:
Coffee
Cocoa
Cotton
Banana
Orange
Lemon
Guava
Tamarind
Prickly Pear
Eugenia
Ipecacuanha
Spanish Seed
1 Piano for Dr Wogan
2 Barrels of Tar

General Stores:
Bibles and Prayer Books
Communion Supplies for Chaplain
9 Hackles for Flax
9 Hackle Pins
18 Coils Whale Line
1 Machine for Dressing Flax
Iron Work and Brushes
250 Pounds of Cotton Candles
168 Pounds of Mould Candles
44 Tons of Tallow
2 Millstones and Spindles
800 Sets of Bedding
1 Loom for Weaving Canvas
28 Marquees for Marines (married)
200 Wooden Containers
40 Camp Kettles
Transport Jack
Ventilators for Wine and Water
Quantity of Hammocks
Quantity of Beds
Quantity of Carbines
Quantity of Hoses

Most flour and seed products were unusable when the fleet reached Australia, the ship "Supply" was soon dispatched to Batavia for stores (April 1790) and a Dutch vessel was hired at that Port, the "Waaksamheyd" which was a Wood Snow or Brig of 350 tons. The cost of this all came to around 11,000 English pounds and was considered exorbitant for the time. HMS "Supply" then returned to her duties.

Such was the First Fleet to Australia and the beginnings of European settlement in this great southern continent. From that moment onward, the trickle of humanity became a stream and the birth of a strong and vibrant nation had begun.

What became of the First Fleet Ships?
"Alexander" went off the shipping register in 1808 and was probably broken up at that time.
"Scarborough" was broken up in 1798 after completing her second voyage out to Australia with convicts
  "Prince of Wales" was registered at Port Royal, Martinique in 1797; her eventual fate is unknown.
"Lady Penryhn" was captured off the West Indies in 1811 and if not scuttled, she was perhaps broken up.
"Charlotte" was lost off Newfoundland in November 1818.

"Friendship" was scuttled on October 28th 1788, in the straits of Maccassar, the crews of both the "Alexander" and the "Friendship" were suffering from scurvy, so much so, that the "Friendship" was scuttled to give the "Alexander" a full complement.
The armed tender "Supply" became so badly in need of repair by the end of May 1791, that she was deemed ready for a total refit. In fact, as early as October 1790, she had been ordered home for just that reason but as she was needed for much work at the new settlement, she did not sail for England until 26th November 1791. She sighted the Lizard on 20th April 1792 and the soon to be famous ship, HMS "Supply" then disappears into the mists of time and was probably broken up.
The Flagship "Sirius" came to an ignominious end at Norfolk Island on the 19th March 1790, when after spending three days discharging convicts, she endeavoured to land provisions when a storm arrived and drove her ashore. No lives were lost but "Sirius" was a total wreck.

                                                                 

              THE NORFOLK ISLAND COLONY.

The first islands off the East Coast of Australia to be investigated, were Norfolk and Lord Howe Islands. The discovery of wonderful stands of timber on Norfolk Island made it necessary that the island be occupied as quickly as was possible.
On the 14th of February 1788, a little less than a month after she had been the first ship to arrive at Botany Bay, the armed tender, ‘Supply’ was sent to Norfolk Island. Her master, David Blackburn, wrote to his sister stating that: ‘in the beginning of February, we took on six months provisions with the necessary implements for settling a colony on Norfolk Island. We sailed on the 14th of February but were soon overtaken by a gale of wind, which continued till the 16th but did us no damage. On the 17th we discovered an island to which we gave the name Lord Howe Island. We put off an examination of this island till our return from Norfolk Island. We arrived at Norfolk Island on the 29th of February but were unable to land until the 3rd of March. We could not land the provisions as the sea broke with great violence on the shore. We therefore went in search of a better place, which I discovered at the south end of the island. Here we landed the colony, with all the stores and provisions, on the 6th and 7th of March, at this place. The Lieutenant gave the name, Sidney Bay’.
Signed: David Blackburn. 

HMS ‘Supply’ carried a surgeon, a master weaver and a midshipman, along with them, she took nine male and six female convicts.
Lieutenant King was made Commandant of Norfolk Island and Mr. Jamieson became surgeon to the small settlement, his assistant was T. Turnpenny Altree. 
The rest of the crew were:
James Cunningham—Masters Mate from the ‘Sirius’. 
Roger Morley—Master Weaver. 
William Westbrook—Sawyer. 
Able seamen: Kerridge and Batchelor.
Convicts: Male, 
Charles McClellan, Richard Widdecombe, John Mortimer, Nathaniel Lucas, Edward Westlocke, Edward Garth, Noah Mortimer and two others. Most of the men came from the ‘Charlotte’, only
two came from the ‘Scarborough’. 
Convicts, Female:  
Elizabeth Lee, Elizabeth Hipsley, Elizabeth Colley, Olivia Gascoin, Ann Innett and Susan Gough. The latter convict was a last minute replacement for Ann Yates who was pregnant with her second child.
An interesting side note to this story is that Ann Yates already had a son, Joseph who was sired by one Joseph Theakson, who was a marine aboard the ‘Lady Penrhyn’. He spent time with Ms Yates during the voyage to Australia. Further to that, none other than Captain David Collins, Judge Advocate sired her later child. Ann Yates was obviously a desirable young woman, for she commanded the attentions of men who held high rank. But this learned gentleman was already married and it is surprising, that Captain Phillip did not have a firm hold on the way his officers behaved with the convict women.
Ann Innett also had a prestigious affair, her paramour was the Commandant of Norfolk Island, Lieutenant Philip Gidley King. This gentleman sired a son by Ann Innett christened with his name on the 9th of July 1790. Two years later, he married her off to a convict named Richard John Robinson and less than two weeks later, Richard Robinson was given ‘Absolute Remission of sentence of transportation, back dated to the 4th of June, 1791 and at the expiration of seven years from that date. Richard Robinson had fourteen years to life to serve. For his favour to the Commandant, his sentence reduction must have been much enjoyed. He not only gained a wife but also four years plus taken from his sentence.
         THE SETTLEMENT AT SYDNEY COVE.
                                                          1800 AD.
Even the French were surprised with the speed at which the British occupied the East Coast of Australia. By 1800, the little settlement was growing fast. In 1802, Captain Nicolas Baudin arrived in Sydney in his ship, ‘La Geographe’ and his naturalists went to work sketching and writing about the surround.
Peron. 
Our arrival at Port Jackson did not excite so much surprise among the colonists as might have been expected; but for ourselves, we were completely astonished at the flourishing state in which we found this singular, and distant establishment; the port at first attracted our whole attention 

Towards the middle of this magnificent port, and on its southern bank, in one of the principal creeks, rises Sydney Town, capital of the county of Cumberland. And of all the English colonies in this part of the world, seated at the base of two hills, they are contiguous to each other; and having the advantage of a rivulet, which runs completely through it, this infant town affords a view, at once agreeable and picturesque. To the right, and at the north point of Sydney Cove, you can perceive the signal battery, which is built upon a rock, difficult of access. Six pieces of cannon, protected by a turf entrenchment, cross their fire with that of another battery, which I shall presently mention; and thus defend in the most effectual manner, the approach to the harbour and the town.
Farther on, appear the large buildings that form the hospital, and which are capable of containing two or three hundred sick. On the same side of the town, at the seashore, you observe a very fine magazine, to which the largest ships can come up, and discharge their cargoes.
 Beyond the hospital, in the same line, is the prison, which has several dungeons, capable of holding from an hundred and fifty to two hundred prisoners; it is surrounded by a high and strong wall, and has a numerous guard on duty, both by day and night.
A short distance from the prison is the storehouse, for the reception of wines, spirituous liquors, salt, provisions &etc. In the front of it is the armoury, where the garrison is drawn up every morning, accompanied by a numerous and well-composed band, belonging to the New South Wales regiment. The house of the Lieutenant-Governor-General occupies the whole western side part of this spot. Behind this is a vast garden, which is worth the attention of the Philosopher and the Naturalist, on account of the great number of useful vegetables which are cultivated in it and which have been procured from every part of the world…
 Between the house and the magazine, just mentioned, is the public school; here are educated in the principals of religion, morality and virtue, those young females, who are the hope of the rising colony, but whose parents are either too degenerate, or too poor, to give them proper instruction….
Behind the house of the Lieutenant governor-general, in a large magazine, are deposited all the dried pulse and corn, belonging to the state. It is a sort of public granary, intended for the support of the troops, and the people, who receive their subsistence from the government. The barracks occupy a considerable square, and have in front several field pieces; the edifices, for the accommodation of the officers, form the lateral parts, or ends of the building; and the powder magazine is in the middle…
Behind the armoury, is a large square tower, which serves for an observatory to those English officers who study astronomy…
Two fine windmills terminate on this side of the sweries of the principal public edifices. Over the rivulet that intersects the town, there was a wooden bridge. Before the departure, the wooden bridge was destroyed; to make way for one, which they were about to build of stone; at the same time, the government built a water mill here…
At the East Point of the creek is a second battery, the fire of which crosses that of the signal station… Near the Government Creek, there are three public magazines. But in order to prevent avaricious speculations, or waste, no one is admitted to these depots without a written order from the governor; in which are specified the articles that the bearer is in need of. In another house, are preserved the different uniforms and clothing for the troops and convicts, as well as vast quantities of sailcloth and cordage, for the Government ships. The last of the three buildings just mentioned, is a kind of public manufactory; in which are employed female convicts. Behind these magazines is the governor’s house, which is built in the Italian style, surrounded by a colonnade, as simple as it is elegant, and in front of which is a fine garden, that descends to the sea-shore…
 A short distance to the southward of Sydney Town, to the left of the great road that leads to Parramatta, you observe the remains of the first public gibbet that was erected on the continent of New Holland. The increase of habitations having caused it to be, as it were surrounded, it has been erected farther away, in the same direction, and near the village of Brickfield….
The great road just mentioned passes through the middle of Brickfield, while a small rivulet intersects it, in an opposite direction. Between this village and Sydney Town, is the public burying ground, which is already rendered as an object of interest and curiosity, by several striking monuments that have been erected in it. The execution of which, is much better than could reasonably have been expected from the state of the arts, in so young a colony”Mns Francois Peron
Naturaliste.

The observations made by the French sounded more like a thorough investigation of the settlement for more than admirable reasons. It was perhaps tinged with a little jealousy, because of the excellent deep-water harbour that the English had secured in such a strategic position.
The Armed vessels, ‘Sirius’ and ‘Supply’ were quickly used as exploration ships and the Southern Pacific became the focus of attention for the British navy.
With the French always near at hand, it became imperative that all islands within the vicinity of the
east coast of Australia, be occupied by Britain in the interest of security.

SYDNEY TOWN
Sydney went ahead at a very fast pace with gardens and small business being set up everywhere; buildings were being erected for the stores needed by the ever-growing convict settlement. Then, as men began to complete their sentences, they took up allotments and many started farms, orchards and many different types of small business.Farming types were allotted land and quickly spread out from the coast toward the Blue Mountains, this was a barrier that would only be a temporary hold up, to the land hungry settlers.Ship dry-docks were soon built and shipbuilding and repair began at an early period during settlement. Road survey and treks of discovery began to take place, new finds were happening every other day. And so began the first heart beats of a new and vital part of the commonwealth.
                                        SETTLING VICTORIA AND VICTORIA
Although whalers and sealers had made camps along the southern shores of the new British possession, it was not until 1803, that a settlement at Port Phillip was attempted. The first ship to take convicts to that area was HMS ‘Calcutta’ under Captain Daniel Woodruff and in the command of Lieutenant-Colonel David Collins. The settlement was deemed a failure after only a few months.
The ‘Calcutta’ and her storeship, ’Ocean’ took up their anchors and sailed for Sullivans Bay in Tasmania. They there founded Hobart town. The settlement was probably supplied from Sydney for the first few years until the New South Wales settlement could allow some of the incoming ships to sail direct to Hobart.
The first vessel to bring convicts direct to that port was the ‘Indefatigable’, which arrived in 1812. Six more years went by and in 1818, the beginning of a very long line of ships to that port commenced. The last ship to arrive at Hobart with convicts was the ‘St Vincent’ in 1853
 After the first attempt at settling Port Phillip, some years went by before another try was made in 1835 when John Bateman ‘purchased’ 600,000 acres of land from the Dutigalla tribe of aborigines. The elders of the tribe were given blankets, knives and axes, some mirrors, handkerchiefs and flour made up the total and final payment.
Another group of settlers from Tasmania, attempted to be part of the foundation of Melbourne when one month after Bateman’s group set up camp at Corio Bay, they began erecting their own buildings. The land bought by Bateman's group was taken over by the Government and two land sales were had, one in June 1837 and the other in September 1838. All Bateman's group got from the whole experience, was the privilege of having hills that surround Melbourne, named after them. Convicts began their journeys to Port Phillip in 1844, 41 years after the first attempt had been made and 9 years after Bateman came to the area. The first convict ship to arrive in 1844 was the ‘Royal George’ and the last was the ‘Eden’ in 1849. A total of 2026 convicts were delivered in ten ships to Port Phillip, of these, 299 were relocated to Hobart town and 20 died. One was relanded from the ‘Stratheden’ before leaving England and so the settlement at Port Phillip [now Melbourne] had its beginnings.

                                 THE CONVICT HULKS OF ENGLAND
When shipment of convicts to the Americas and Africa, prison close to the departure points became a necessary requisite for their military guards. Ships that were no longer of good use at sea were stripped of their topmasts and gear. These vessels were well suited for the work as they were round bottom ships that would not roll over when the tide went out.
So, they were place at strategic points on the English mud flats and cells, toilets and punishment areas were built into them. Soon, they were filled to overloading and more were bought by the Admiralty so as to stop the overcrowding as the prisoners waited for the convict ships to take them to the selected colony.At first, these hulks were hellholes and it was some time before decent humanity stepped in to clean them up. Two very well known hulks at Deptford and Plymouth were the ‘Discovery’ and the ‘York’.Woolwich had the ‘Justicia’ the ‘Censor’, ’Stanislaus’ and the ‘Ceres’, which was used to hold convicts going to America and in her last two years, Australia. This vessel was discharged from her hulk duties on March 13th 1791.Langstone Harbour had the ‘Fortune’ and a single unknown hospital hulk. Hamoaze Harbour at Plymouth had the ‘Dunkirk’ hulk, which was also finally discharged in 1791.Portsmouth had the ‘Lion’ and the hospital hulk ‘Laurell’.Although these ships received a very bad name as prison hulks, they were once great ships of the sea and some actually fought in wars while others defended their passengers against piracy. Some were also very involved in the East Indies traThe first islands off the East Coast of Australia to be investigated, were Norfolk and Lord Howe Islands. The discovery of wonderful stands of timber on Norfolk Island made it necessary that the island be occupied as quickly as was possible.

                                          THE NORFOLK ISLAND COLONY
On the 14th of February 1788, a little less than a month after she had been the first ship to arrive at Botany Bay, the armed tender, ‘Supply’ was sent to Norfolk Island. Her master, David Blackburn, wrote to his sister stating that: ‘in the beginning of February, we took on six months provisions with the necessary implements for settling a colony on Norfolk Island. We sailed on the 14th of February but were soon overtaken by a gale of wind, which continued till the 16th but did us no damage. On the 17th we discovered an island to which we gave the name Lord Howe Island. We put off an examination of this island till our return from Norfolk Island. We arrived at Norfolk Island on the 29th of February but were unable to land until the 3rd of March. We could not land the provisions as the sea broke with great violence on the shore. We therefore went in search of a better place, which I discovered at the south end of the island. Here we landed the colony, with all the stores and provisions, on the 6th and 7th of March, at this place. The Lieutenant gave the name, Sidney Bay’.
Signed: David Blackburn.
HMS ‘Supply’ carried a surgeon, a master weaver and a midshipman, along with them, she took nine male and six female convicts.
Lieutenant King was made Commandant of Norfolk Island and Mr. Jamieson became surgeon to the small settlement, his assistant was T. Turnpenny Altree. The rest of the crew was:
James Cunningham—Masters Mate from the ‘Sirius’. Roger Morley—Master Weaver. William Westbrook—Sawyer. Able seamen: Kerridge and Batchelor.
Convicts:
Male, Charles McClellan, Richard Widdecombe, John Mortimer, Nathaniel Lucas, Edward Westlocke, Edward Garth, Noah Mortimer and two others. Most of the men came from the ‘Charlotte’, only two came from the ‘Scarborough’.
Female: Elizabeth Lee, Elizabeth Hipsley, Elizabeth Colley, Olivia Gascoin, Ann Innett and Susan Gough. The latter convict was a last minute replacement for Ann Yates who was pregnant with her second child.
An interesting side note to this story is that Ann Yates already had a son, Joseph who was sired by one Joseph Theakson, who was a marine aboard the ‘Lady Penrhyn’. He spent time with Ms Yates during the voyage to Australia. Further to that, none other than Captain David Collins, Judge Advocate sired her later child. Ann Yates was obviously a desirable young woman, for she commanded the attentions of men who held high rank. But this learned gentleman was already married and it is surprising, that Captain Phillip did not have a firm hold on the way his officers behaved with the convict women.
Ann Innett also had a prestigious affair, her paramour was the Commandant of Norfolk Island, Lieutenant Philip Gidley King. This gentleman sired a son by Ann Innett christened with his name on the 9th of July 1790. Two years later, he married her off to a convict named Richard John Robinson and less than two weeks later, Richard Robinson was given ‘Absolute Remission of sentence of transportation back dated to the 4th of June, 1791 and at the expiration of seven years from that date. Richard Robinson had fourteen years to life to serve. For his favour to the Commandant, his sentence reduction must have been much enjoyed. He not only gained a wife but also had four years plus taken from his sentence.


                               MAIN CONVICT SHIP REGISTER.
                                                                   1789-1868.

Searching for convict arrivals can be a little tricky and in some cases it should be noted that many convicts, although registered as having been transported to Hobart or Port Phillip, may have been sent on to Sydney aboard the same or another vessel. Records of these additional transportations, are usually included in library convict shipping lists.

Convict apparel and sleeping materials:
To gain insight to what the convict fashions were like, I am including a list of clothes etc so the reader may visualise the everyday convict of Australia.
One Hammock, one quilt and bedding, one pillow, one blue jacket, one pair trousers, one dungaree
blue jacket, one pair black trousers. One frock, one red night cap, one check shirt, one pair flannel socks, one black handkerchief, one pair shoes, one straw hat, one tin mug with lid on hock [handle], one plate, one spoon and one tooth comb. 

LADY JULIANA’ Wood ship of 401 Tons. Length; app 155 ft. Breadth; app 35 ft. Depth; app 21 ft. Chartered by William Richards junior, for a voyage to Australia with 226 female convicts. She departed Plymouth on July 29th 1789 and arrived Port Jackson on June 3rd 1790 a voyage of 309 days. Master: Lieutenant Thomas Edgar. Surgeon: Richard Alley. 

GUARDIAN’ Wood Storeship of app 400 Tons. She carried 25 convicts and a number of superintendents for the penal colony at Port Jackson. She departed Spithead on the 12th of September 1789. Master Thomas Clements. Commander: Lieutenant Edward Rion RN. She struck an iceberg in the southern latitudes after having left South Africa for Australia. She was kept afloat only by having her cargo thrown overboard and by the fothering of her stern with a studdingsail filled with oakum. The crew was unable to find the leaks and the pumps did not seem to be gaining.
The officers and crew took to the boats and left about 60 persons, 21 of them convict, still aboard the sinking ship. She did not sink though and she drifted until boats at False Bay on the coast of Africa eventually rescued her. She was wrecked at False Bay after dragging her anchors in a storm one month after she had arrived. The convicts who were on the ‘Guardian’ until the end were eventually transported to Sydney where some were pardoned and others served out their terms.  

                             THE SECOND FLEET                                                           
                                            1790. 

Three ships departed England in December 1790. They travelled in convoy and were officially the second fleet to Australia. They were under the overall command of Lieutenant John Shapcote who was the naval agent. His was a dreadful command, for over 280 convicts died during the voyage. Many were terribly ill when the convoy arrived and the greater number of deaths occurred on the Neptune, the vessel on which Shapcote based himself. Shapcote was not a suitable person to hold command of a convict ship let alone a fleet. He allowed the very vicious Captain Donald Trail of the ‘Neptune’, to give the convicts a hellish time before he [Shapcote] himself died, sometime soon after leaving Cape Town on the final leg of the voyage. Trail was probably a weakling who feared for his own safety and therefore had his men keep the convicts below decks for almost the entire voyage. 

SURPRIZE’ Wood ship of 400 Tons. She carried 256 male convicts to Port Jackson in company with two other vessels, which made up the second fleet. ‘Neptune’ and the ‘Scarborough’, which ships had already made a voyage with the first fleet, accompanied her. Master: Captain Nicholas Anstis. Surgeon: William Walters. 

NEPTUNE’ Built 1779,on the Thames River, London. Wood ship of 809 Tons. She carried 424 male and 78 female convicts to Port Jackson. She took on another 12 convicts at Cape Town and had 147 male deaths and 11 female deaths en-route The treatment of the convicts on the ‘Neptune’ has been recorded as the worst that had ever been shown to any of the thousands of convicts that were brought to Australia. The death toll was horrific even though the time for the voyage was not overly long. She departed England on the 19th of January 1790 and arrived on the 28th of June 1790. Master: Captain Donald Trail. Surgeon: William Gray. 

SCARBOROUGH’ [2nd voyage] Wood ship of 418 Tons. She carried a total of 261 convicts to Australia and lost 73 en-route. She disembarked 188 convicts after a horror voyage. Master: John Marshall. Surgeon: A. J. Beyer.  

            SHIPS THAT MADE SOLO VOYAGES IN 1791. 

MARY ANN’ Built 1772 in France. Wood ship of 298 Tons. She carried 150 female convicts to Port Jackson and had nine deaths en-route. She left England on the 16th of February 1791 and arrived on July 9th 1791. Master: Captain Mark Munroe. Owned by Captain Mark Munro and Co. Surgeon: [Unable to retrieve from records available]. According to the arrival lists for this vessel, 156 females were embarked, 12 were crossed off the list and did not sail. The convict list of arrivals gives 143 as the number that were disembarked. Two convicts are registered as having transferred to ‘Jackson’, this may have meant to Port Jackson via another vessel, explaining why only 141 names appear on the arrival muster. Two convicts therefore appear to be missing. The two women were Elizabeth Wylie and Ann Nixon. The ‘Mary Ann’ gave good service and she was still sailing in 1798 with Captain Munro keeping her going. [See ‘Albermarle’ for convict list discrepancy]

HMS ‘GORGON’ Wood 44 gun frigate of approx. 420 Tons. She carried 31 male convicts and left England with stores for the convict settlement on the 15th of March 1791. She arrived at Port Jackson on the 21st of September 1791.She had one male convict die en-route. Master and Surgeon unknown. 

                THE THIRD FLEET [1ST DIVISION] 

A third fleet of ships, nine in number, left England on or about the 27th of March 1791, they were divided into two groups. Each group had an overall commander:

Division 1. Commander: Lieutenant Richard Bowen. 

ATLANTIC’ Built 1784 in Wales. Wood ship of 422 Tons. She carried 220 male convicts to Port Jackson and had 18 deaths en-route. She landed 202 convicts. Master: Captain Archibald Armstrong. Surgeon: James Thompson. 

SALAMANDER’ Built 1776 on the Thames River in London. Wood ship of 320 Tons. Owned by P. Mellish. She carried 160 Male convicts to Port Jackson and had 5 deaths en-route, she landed 155 convicts on the 21st of August 1791.Master: Captain Nichol. Charles Bateson, in his book, ‘The Convict Ships’ is unsure if Captain Nichol commanded this vessel on her 1791 voyage to Botany Bay. Lloyds Lists categorically states that he was her commander for that voyage, he also had her until 1797 when she was given over to Captain B. Francis for a few months and he then relinquished her to Captain W. Irish in the same year. 

WILLIAM AND ANN’ Built 1759 in London at the Kings Yards. Wood ship of 370 Tons. Owned by St Brbe and Co. She carried 188 convicts to Port Jackson and had 7 deaths en-route. She landed 181 convicts. She arrived on the 28th of August 1791. Master: Captain E. Bunker. Charles Bateson was also unsure if Captain E. Bunker was the commander for the 1791 convict voyage to Botany Bay. A possible reason for this is the way that names were hand written in those days, Some lists are almost unreadable and require much patience. The name Bunker also, in some places looks like Barker. As with the ‘Salamander’, Lloyds List also shows that Captain Bunker was definitely in command for that voyage. She continued to sail to Australia up until the turn of the century. Captain Bunker [perhaps Barker] remained with her until 1794 when Captain Cowan took her.                                                                                                                                                  

   
                   THIRD FLEET [2ND DIVISION]                                            Division 2. Commander: Lieutenant Robert Parry Young. 

ACTIVE’ Built 1764 at Shoreham, Philadelphia. Wood brig of 350 Tons. She carried 175 convicts to Port Jackson and had 21 deaths en-route. She landed 154 convicts. She arrived on the 26th of September 1791.Owned by Calvert and Co. Master: Captain George Bowen. Charles Bateson in his book,’ The Convict Ships’, gives John Mitchison as master of this vessel. It is more likely that Mitchison was the surgeon as Captain George Bowen took this vessel over from Captain Weatherhead in 1790. He remained with her until almost the turn of the century. ’Active’ went off the register in 1798. [See ‘Matilda’] 

MATILDA’ Built in France in 1779.Wood ship of 460 Tons. Owned by Calvert and Co. She carried 230 male convicts and had 25 deaths on the voyage out. She landed 205 convicts at Port Jackson on the 1st of August 1791, having taken four months and five days for the voyage. Master: Captain M Weatherhead who had previously commanded the ‘Active’. It is believed that Calvert and Co, who were extremely taken with the convict trade, brought out of retirement, two tired vessels. Both were French built and both were probably captured as prizes. ‘Matilda’ is shown as being built in France in 1779 and the ‘Albermarle’ was probably an older ship, also built in France. Captain Weatherhead was also probably due for retirement. He had previously been master of the ‘Active’ for Calvert and Co and it is likely that they also brought him back for one voyage in the ‘Matilda’ which went off the register in 1794. Captain Boulton had the ‘Albermarle’ which also went off the register the moment she returned from Sydney. He may have been a retired captain as well. [See ‘Active’] 

ALBERMARLE’ Built c1760 in France. Wood ship of 530 Tons. She carried 282 male convicts and 6 female convicts to Port Jackson and had 32 deaths en-route. She arrived on the 13th of October 1791.Owned by Calvert and Co. Master: Captain J. Boulton. Charles Bateson mistakenly gives Captain George Bowen as master of this vessel in his book, ‘The Convict Ships’. In fact Bowen was master of the ‘Active’ from 1790 until 1797. [See ‘Active’].Albermarle’ had originally embarked male convicts only. Somehow, six females who had been sentenced to transportation at Middlesex mysteriously appear on the convict list of the ‘Albermarle’. They were all sentenced on the 16th of February 1791 and were hurriedly placed aboard the ‘Albermarle’ only being officially listed midway through the arrival list. Only two men were sentenced on that same day and at that same place, they too, were on board. The Author believes that the females and the two men, were rushed straight from court to the ‘Albermarle’ and were not from the ‘Mary Ann’ as thought by Bateson.

Charles Bateson believed that the 6 women were taken off the ‘Mary Ann’. That vessel left England on the 16th of February 1791 and arrived in Sydney on the 9th of July 1791. This was a record for a convict ship of that era, a voyage of 143 days. ‘Mary Ann’ stopped only at St Jago on the outward voyage and ‘Albermarle’ was at least a month behind her and in company with others of the third fleet. She did not arrive until October, three months after the ‘Mary Ann’. The convict muster for ‘Mary Ann’ does not show the names of these women although there are about twelve names crossed out and are for the most part, unreadable. The female convicts placed aboard the ‘Albermarle’ were: Elizabeth Ozeland, Ann Griffin, Mary Gorman, Sarah Walker alias Frost, Elizabeth Cave and Sarah Smith. It is far more likely that they were rushed aboard ‘Albermarle’ just before the ship left for Australia. Two male convicts aboard this vessel were sentenced on the same day as the women; they also faced court at Middlesex and were probably sent aboard the vessel along with the women. The rest of the convicts faced court from 1789 to 1790. The 12 female convicts that were crossed off the list of the ‘Mary Ann’, were probably sent out aboard the ‘Pitt’ or perhaps one of the smaller Brigs or Schooners that were contracted on occasions. 

BRITANNIA I’ Built 1783 at Bridgeport. Wood ship of 301 Tons. She carried 150 male convicts to Port Jackson with 21 deaths being recorded for her voyage She arrived on the 14th of October, 1791.She was owned by Le Messurier in 1790,her master at that time was Captain T. Pace. Captain Thomas Melville then took her in1791. She was sold to S. Enderby for the convict service. This vessel was the first of the ‘Britannia’ ships to arrive with convicts in 1791. She then returned with more in 1798.This ship should not be confused with the ship of the same name whose master was Captain Dennett. [See ‘Britannia’ II]. Eventually, she was taken over by Captain Robert Turnbull who had her for her second voyage to Sydney with convicts. He took her in 1797 from Captain Melville. 

ADMIRAL BARRINGTON’ Built 1781. Wood ship of 533 Tons. She carried 300 male convicts to Port Jackson and recorded 21 deaths on this voyage. She arrived on the 16th of October 1791. Master: Captain Robert Marsh. Surgeon: Peter Gossam. 

QUEEN’ Built 1773 and was built at Georgia. Wood ship of 400 Tons. She carried 133 male and 22 female convicts to Port Jackson and had 7 male deaths en-route. She arrived on the 26th of September 1791. Master: Captain Richard Owen. This vessel left from Ireland and had her own naval agent on board; his name and rank are recorded as Lieutenant Samuel Blow. ‘Queen’ was the first ship to take Irish convicts to Australia. 

              The beginning of Freelance operations
                                           1792. 

Contractors were now offering their ships for charter to the English government in increasing numbers and the government let its quality control slip away as the privateers took control of the convict trade. More convicts died on some of these hellish voyages than ever before and the suffering and degradation must have been terrible, even more so for the Irish convicts, who always got the short end of the stick in the suffering stakes. It was obvious though, that some ship owners and their masters felt some sort of guilt, for it can be seen in this register which ships had the better record in health and humanity. 

PITT’ Built 1780.Wood ship of 775 Tons. She carried 344 male and 58 female convicts to Port Jackson and had 5 convicts escape and 20 male and 9 female deaths during the voyage. She arrived on the 14th of February 1792. Master: Captain Edward Manning. Surgeon: Mr. Jamieson. 

ROYAL ADMIRAL’ Built 1777. Length: 120 ft. Breadth: 38 ft. Wood ship of 914 Tons. She carried 299 male and 49 female convicts to Port Jackson and had 10 male and 2 female deaths en-route. She arrived on the 7th of October 1792. Master: Captain E. H. Bond. Surgeon: Richard Kent. 

KITTY’ Wood ship of 363 Tons. She carried 10 male and 30 female convicts to Port Jackson and had 8 males escape during the voyage. She had 3 female deaths. She arrived on the 18th of November 1792. Master: Captain George Ramsay. Surgeon: J. P. Niebuhr. 
                                             1793. 

BELLONA’ Built 1782.Wood ship of 472 Tons. She carried 17 female convicts to Port Jackson and landed all safely. Master: She arrived on the 16th of January 1793. Captain Mathew Boyd. Surgeon: Richard Clarke. 

BODDINGTONS’ Built 1781.Wood ship of 331 Tons. She carried 125 male and 20 female convicts to Port Jackson. She arrived on the 7th of August 1793. Only one death [male] was recorded en-route. Master: Captain Robert Charmers. Surgeon Richard Kent. 

SUGAR CANE’ Built 1786. Wood ship of 403 Tons. She carried 110 male and 50 female convicts to Port Jackson and recorded one male death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 12th of April 1793 and arrived at Sydney on the 17th of September 1793. Master: Captain Thomas Musgrave. Surgeon: David Wake Bell.  
 
                                                                 1794. 

WILLIAM’ Built 1770 in France. Wood storeship of 305 Tons. She carried one [1] female convict to Port Jackson and was recognised more as a store ship than a convict vessel. She arrived on the 10th of March 1794. Master: Captain William Folger. 

SURPRIZE’ [2ND voyage] Wood ship of 400 Tons. She carried 23 male and 60 female convicts to Port Jackson and had no deaths recorded She arrived on the 25th of October 1794. . Master: Captain Patrick Campbell. Surgeon: James Thompson.

                                             1795. 

SOVEREIGN’ Wood storeship of 362 Tons. She carried one [1] male convict, [Joseph Gerrald] a Scottish political prisoner to Port Jackson. She arrived on the 5th of November 1795. Master: Captain George Storey. 
                                              
                                            1796. 

MARQUIS CORNWALLIS’ Built 1789. Wood ship of 654 Tons. She carried 163 male and 70 female convicts to Port Jackson. She suffered a mutiny aboard during her voyage and 7 convicts died of musket wounds. She had 4 other deaths [all male] en-route. She arrived on the 11th of February 1796. Master: Captain Michael Hogan. Surgeon: Matthew Austin. 

INDISPENSABLE’ Built 1791 in France. Wood ship of 351 Tons. She departed England about October 1795 and carried 133 female convicts to Port Jackson. She arrived on the 30th of April 1796. Two [2] deaths were recorded en-route. Master: Captain Wilkinson. 

                                               1797. 

LADY SHORE’ Built at Hull in 1793. Wood ship of 316 Tons. She embarked a group of New South Wales Corp guardsmen along with 1 male and 66 female convicts. She departed England in May 1797 and was taken by mutiny on the 1st of August 1797 Master: Captain James Willcocks. Mate: Lambert. 2nd Mate: Minchin. The Guardsmen were mostly French and Irish deserters who were being sent out to Port Jackson on guard duty with little hope of being sent back to Britain. It took no time at all before rumours of a mutiny were in the air and even less time for one to be effected. The ‘Lady Shore’ became the first and only successful mutiny of a convict ship. She sailed in May 1797 and did not even make Rio de Janiero before the mutiny was in full swing. Her master, Captain Willcocks was killed and her officers were placed in a long boat with 29 men and women and were cast adrift off the coast of Brazil. The ‘Lady Shore’ was sailed to Montevideo and was taken as a prize of war by the Spanish and the mutineers were taken as prisoners of war while the female convicts were placed as servants to the Spanish nobility in that city. The male convict [Major Semple] eventually made his way to the British authorities in Morocco and surrendered himself. 

BRITANNIA’II. Built 1774 at East India. Wood [Teak] ship of 500 Tons. Owned by Water and Co. This vessel had been copper sheathed on her hull and should have been roomy for the 188 convicts but her captain was a vicious type who probably feared the convicts and therefore treated them savagely. She carried 144 male and 44 female convicts to Port Jackson. She sailed from Cork, Ireland on the 10th of December 1796 and arrived on the 27th of May 1797. There were 11 deaths recorded for the voyage. She earned herself an extremely bad reputation by the many convicts who were flogged to death during the voyage. Master: Captain Thomas Dennett. Surgeon: A.J.Beyer. This vessel went on to a whaling career in the Southern regions under the Water and Co flag after being disallowed to continue in the convict service due to the heavy handed treatment meted out to the convicts. 

GANGES’ Built c1792, in India. Wood ship of 700 Tons. She carried 203 male convicts to Port Jackson She had 13 deaths en-route. She arrived on the 2ND OF June 1797. Master: Captain Thomas Patrickson. Surgeon: James Mileham. 

                                               1798. 

BARWELL’ Built at London in 1782. Wood ship of 796 Tons. She carried 296 male convicts to Port Jackson and had 9 deaths en-route. She arrived on the 18th of May 1798. Master: Captain John Cameron. Surgeon: John Sharpe. 

BRITANNIA‘I [2nd voyage] Built at Bridgeport in 1783. Wood ship of 301 Tons. She carried 96 female convicts and had two [2] deaths recorded en-route. She departed England about February 1798 and arrived in Sydney on the 18th of July 1798. Master: Captain Robert Turnbull. 

                                              1799. 

HILLSBOROUGH’ Built c1790. Wood ship of 764 Tons. She carried 300 male convicts to Sydney and had 95 deaths due to fever and illness caused by the conditions existing in the hulks at Portsmouth, England. She departed England on the 23rd of December 1799 and arrived in Sydney on the 26th of July 1799.Master: Captain William Hingston. Surgeon: John J. W. Kunst

                                              1800. 

With the turn of the century, records were of much better quality and fewer mistakes were made. Charles Bateson in his ‘The Convict ships’ found it hard to separate two ships of the same name, ‘Britannia’. The first ship of this name arrived in 1791 and returned to Australia in 1798. The other vessel was used only once and that caused problems for ship researchers. 

MINERVA’ Built in India c1792. Wood ship of 558 Tons. She carried 165 male and 26 female convicts to Sydney. She recorded 3 male deaths en-route. Master: Captain Joseph Salkeld. She arrived on the 11th of January 1800. 

FRIENDSHIP’ Built at London in 1793. Wood ship of 430 Tons. She carried 133 male convicts to Sydney and recorded 19 deaths en-route. She arrived on the 16th of February 1800. Master: Captain Hugh Reed. 

SPEEDY’ Built at London in 1779. Wood ship of 313 Tons. She carried 53 female convicts to Sydney and recorded 3 deaths en-route. She arrived on the 15th of April 1800. Master: Captain George Quested. 

ROYAL ADMIRAL’ Built 1777, Wood ship of 914 Tons. She carried 300 male convicts to Sydney and recorded 43 deaths en-route. She arrived in Sydney on the 20th of November 1800. Master: Captain William Wilson. Surgeon: Samuel Turner who himself died en-route. A small naval action occurred while the ‘Royal Admiral’ was running in convoy with two British frigates. The frigates caused two French men of war to strike their colours [surrender] and the French prisoners were placed among the convicts on the ‘Royal Admiral’. The French complained bitterly at having been robbed by the convicts while imprisoned among them. 

                                                 1801. 

ANNE’ ex ‘LUZ ST ANNA’ Built in Spain c1790. Wood ship of 384 Tons. She carried 147 male and 34 female convicts to Sydney and had 3 male deaths recorded en-route. She sailed from Cork, Ireland and arrived Sydney on the 21st of February 1801. Master: Captain Jasper Stewart. 

EARL CORNWALLIS’ Built London in 1783. Wood ship of 784 Tons. She carried 193 male and 95 female convicts to Sydney and had 27 male and 8 female deaths recorded en-route. She arrived on the 12th of June 1801. Master: Captain J. Tennant. 

CANADA’ Built at London at Shields in 1800. Wood ship of 393 Tons. She carried 101 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She arrived in Sydney on the 14th of December 1801. . Master: Captain William Williamson. Surgeon: J Kelly. 

MINORCA’ Built at Newcastle-on -Tyne in 1799. Wood ship of 407 Tons. She carried 101 male convicts to Sydney and had 2 deaths recorded en-route. She sailed from Spithead on the 21st of June 1801 and arrived on the 14th of December 1801. . Master: Captain John Leith. Surgeon: George Longstaff. 

NILE I’ Built at Newcastle, England in 1799. Wood ship of 322 Tons. She carried 96 female convicts to Sydney with no deaths en-route. She sailed on the 21st of June 1801 in company with ‘Minorca’ and arrived on the 14th of December 1801. Master: Captain J. Sunter. Surgeon J Hislop 

                                         1802. 

COROMANDEL I’ [1st voyage] Built at Chittagong in 1793. Wood ship of 522 Tons. She carried 138 male convicts to Sydney and had one [1] death recorded en-route. She sailed on the 12th of February 1802 from Spithead and arrived in Sydney on the 13th of June 1802. . Master: Captain Alexander Sterling. Surgeon: Charles Throsby. 

HERCULES I’ Built at Shields in 1801. Wood ship of 406 Tons. She carried 140 male and 25 female convicts to Sydney. She recorded 44 male deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 29th of November 1801 and arrived in Sydney on the 26th of June 1802. Master: Captain L. Betts. Surgeon: J. J.W. Kunst. She sailed in company with the ‘Atlas’ and after a short time together, they were separated. There had been rumours aboard ‘Hercules’ that a mutiny was in the air. On the 29th of December 1801, the rumours turned to reality as the convicts made their attempt to seize the ship.

An well-armed and ready crew quickly put down the mutiny. The ringleaders were brought to the quarterdeck where the instigator of the plot, Jeremy Prendergast, knelt before the captain pleading his innocence. Captain Betts calmly shot him in the head. Of the convicts aboard, 44 died of hunger and illness during the rest of the voyage due to the captain keeping them below decks and under close guard. Captain Betts went to trial for killing Prendergast and also for killing 13 other convicts during the mutiny. He was acquitted of killing the 13 convicts but was convicted of the manslaughter of Jeremy Prendergast. He was fined 500 pounds and the court ordered that he be held in custody until the fine was paid. Governor King came to the rescue of Captain Betts by granting him a pardon until he could face the English courts. In a world where one could be sent to the colonies for seven years to life for stealing a loaf of bread, the English courts have no records of any further action being taken against Captain Betts. 

ATLAS I’ [1st voyage] Built at Shields in 1801. Wood ship of 437 Tons. She carried 151 male and 28 female convicts to Sydney. She departed Ireland on the 29th of November 1801, and arrived at Sydney on the 7th of July 1802. She had 63 male and 2 female deaths en-route and re-landed 3 of her convicts before sailing. Master: Captain Richard Brooks. Surgeon: E. Walker.

Although this ship left in company with ‘Hercules’, she soon parted and without knowing of the dramas taking place aboard that ship, seemed set on creating inhumanity records of her own. This vessel took her convicts aboard at Dublin, Ireland and many were very ill due to Typhus when embarked. After sailing from Cork, she suffered bad weather all the way to Rio, at which port it was deemed necessary to stop due to damage to the mizzenmast.  Fifteen of her convicts had already died in the four weeks at sea and more were sick everyday. The death toll kept rising and by the time the ship reached Cape Town, she'd had 25 convict deaths. During the next stage of the voyage, a Sergeant of the guard and one of his soldier’s wives died and it was claimed by Captain Brooks that they had died due to poison administered by the convicts who were trying to kill all officers and guards aboard. The captain even tried to claim that the convicts had tried to mutiny but the committee rejected all these claims assigned to investigate the death toll, which stood at 65 by the time she reached Sydney. Four other males died a few days after arrival. Governor King stated that ‘the condition of the convicts on both the ‘Hercules’ and the ‘Atlas I’ were in a miserable state with some of them lying dead with heavy irons still attached to them. Captain Brooks also received no punishment for his inhumanity to his fellow man. 

PERSEUS’ Built 1789. Wood ship of 362 Tons. She carried 112 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths recorded for the voyage. She departed Spithead, England on the 12th of February 1802 and arrived in Sydney on the 4th of August 1802. Master: Captain John Davidson. Surgeon: W. S. Fielding. 

ATLAS II’ Built 1801 at Quebec, Canada. Wood ship of 547 Tons. She carried 193 male convicts to Sydney and had 4 deaths en-route. She landed 188 convicts safely so it is assumed that one convict escaped. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 30th of May 1802 and arrived on the 30th of October 1802. Master: Captain T. Musgrave. Surgeon: T. Davie. 

                             FIRST SHIPS TO TASMANIA 
                                                       
                                                                         1803  

HMS ‘CALCUTTA’ She was a Wood naval ship that carried 307 male convicts and 30 of their wives and children to Port Phillip on April 24th, 1803. She arrived there on the 9th of October 1803 sailing from Spithead with the Storeship ‘OCEAN’. She had eight deaths en -route and landed the rest safely. Her commander, Lieutenant Colonel David Collins, who had been the Judge advocate in the First Fleet, decided that the Port Phillip site was not suitable and in early 1804, he moved the whole group to Sullivans Bay, Tasmania where he founded Hobart. She was a 50-gun ship.

HMS ‘GLATTON’ Wood Royal Navy ship that carried 271 male and 130 female convicts to Sydney. She had 7 male and 5 female deaths en-route. She departed England on the 23rd of September 1802 and arrived in Sydney on the 11th of March 1803. She was a sister to the HMS ‘Calcutta’ and was a 50-gun ship. Master: Captain J. Surgeon: J. Mountgarrett. 

ROLLA’ Built 1800. Wood ship of 438 Tons. She carried 127 male and 37 female convicts to Sydney. She had 3 deaths en-route and 5 male escapes. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 4th of November 1802 and arrived at Sydney on the 12th of May 1803. Master: Captain Robert Cumming. Surgeon: John Buist 

                                               1804. 

COROMANDEL I’ [2nd voyage] Built 1793 at Chittagong. Wood ship of 522 Tons. She carried 138 male convicts to Sydney and had one [1] death en-route. She departed England on the 4th of December 1803 and arrived in Sydney on the 7th of May 1804. Master: Captain John Robinson. 

EXPERIMENT I’ Built 1798 at Stockton. Wood ship of 568 Tons. She carried 2 male and 130 female convicts to Sydney and had six [6] female deaths en-route. She departed Cowes on the 2nd of January 1804 and arrived in Sydney on the 24th of June 1804. Master: Captain F. J. Withers. 

                                              1806. 

TELLICHERRY’ Built 1796 on the Thames at London. Wood ship of 467 Tons. Master: Captain T. Cuzens. Surgeon: John Connellan. She sailed from Cork, Ireland on the 31st of August 1805 and arrived in Sydney on the 15th of February 1806. She carried 130 male and 36 female convicts and had 5 males and 1 female die en-route. This vessel was lost on her return voyage to England after having taken cargo in China, she was wrecked near the Philippines in the South China Sea. 

WILLIAM PITT’ Built 1804. Wood ship of 604 Tons. She carried one [1] male and 120 female convicts to Sydney. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 31st if August 1805 in company with the ship ‘Tellicherry’. She had 2 female deaths en-route and arrived in Sydney on the 11th of April 1806. Master: Captain John Boyce. Surgeon: Joshua Blyer. 

FORTUNE’ [1st voyage] Built in Spain c1790. Wood ship of 620 Tons. She carried 260 male convict to Sydney, departing England on the 28th of January 1806. She arrived in Sydney on the 12th of July 1806. Her Master was Captain Henry Moore. 

ALEXANDER I’ Built Quebec in 1801. Wood ship of 278 Tons. She carried 42 female convicts to Sydney and departed England on the 28th of January 1806 and arrived in Sydney on the 20th of August 1806. She carried some of the male convicts from the ‘Fortune’. Master: Captain Brooks, who later became Richard Brooks JP of Liverpool, Sydney Australia. No deaths were recorded against the ‘Alexander I’ on this voyage. 

                                                 1807. 

SYDNEY COVE’ Built in Rotterdam, Holland in 1801. Wood ship of 282 Tons. She carried 4 male and 113 female convicts to Sydney. She departed Falmouth on the 11th of January 1806. She had 3 female deaths en-route and arrived in Sydney on the 20th of August 1806. Master: Captain William Edwards. 

DUKE OF PORTLAND’ [1st voyage] Built at Bordeaux, France in 1790. Wood ship of 623 Tons. She carried 189 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed England about January 1807 and arrived at Sydney on the 27th of July 1807. Master: Captain John C. Spence. 

                                                1808. 

SPEKE I’ [1st voyage] Built 1790 at Calcutta, India. Wood ship of 473 Tons. She carried 96 female convicts to Sydney having one [1] death en-route. She departed Falmouth, England on the 18th of May 1808 and arrived in Sydney on the 16th of November 1808. Master: Captain John Hingston. Surgeon: J. Macmillan. 

ADMIRAL GAMBIER’ [1st voyage] Built 1808 at Newcastle, England. Wood ship of 501 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and recorded deaths en-route. She landed 197 of her convicts, although it is unclear if she had three deaths or at least one or two escapes during the voyage. She departed Falmouth, England on the 2nd of July 1808 and arrived in Sydney on the 20th of December 1808. Master: Edward Harrison. 

                                               1809. 

AEOLUS’ Built c1801 in Denmark. Wood ship of 289 Tons. She carried 79 female convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed England about September 1808 and arrived in Sydney on the 26th of January 1809. Master: Captain Robert Addie. Surgeon: Richard Hughes. 

EXPERIMENT II’ Built 1802 in Georgia. Wood Brig of 146 Tons. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 21st of January 1909 and arrived in Sydney on the 25th of June 1809. Master: Captain Joshua Dodds. 

BOYD’ Built 1793 in London. Wood ship of 392 Tons. She carried 139 male convicts to Sydney and had 5 deaths en-route. Master: Captain John Thompson. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 10th of March 1809 and arrived in Sydney on the 14th of August 1809. She departed Sydney on November 8th, 1809 and headed New Zealand to load spars. She anchored in Whangaroa harbour in early December and deposited two Maori headmen who had been in Sydney and who had been mishandled on the trip across the Tasman. It is surmised that this heavy-handed treatment was the reason for an attack made on the ‘Boyd’ before she had time to sail. She was attacked quickly and quietly, giving the crew little time for defence and all aboard [numbering over 50] were killed. Only a Mrs. Morley, her daughter, a female friend [Betsy Broughton] and a young boy [Thomas Davis] were saved. The ship was burned after gunpowder exploded and she sank in shallow water. A very interesting side note to the ‘Boyd’ story was that her longboat was saved and turned into a small sailing schooner being named after her mother ship. This little craft, in her turn, was wrecked on the 16th of July 1812 not far from Port Stephens, New South Wales. 

INDISPENSABLE’ Built c1800. Wood Brig of 350 Tons. She carried 62 female convicts to Sydney and recorded one [1] death en-route She departed England on the 2nd of March 1809 and arrived in Sydney on the 18th of August 1809. . Master: Captain H. Best. Surgeon: William Evans. 
                                               1810. 

ANNE II’ Built c1800. Wood ship of 627 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney but is believed that she relanded 2 of them before sailing and she recorded one [1] death en-route. She sailed from England in or about October 1809 and arrived in Sydney on the 27th of February 1810. Master: Charles Clarke. 

CANADA’ [2nd voyage] Built 1800 at Shields, England. Wood ship of 393 Tons. She carried122 female convicts and had one [1] death en-route. She departed England on the 23rd of March 1810 and arrived in Sydney on the 8th of September 1810. Master: Captain John B. Ward. 

INDIAN’ Built 1809 at Whitby, Yorkshire. Wood ship of 522 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and recorded 8 deaths en-route. She departed England on the 18th of July 1810 and arrived in Sydney on the 16th of December 1810. . Master: Captain Andrew Barclay. Surgeon: Mains. 

                                                 1811 

PROVIDENCE I’ Built 1808. Wood ship of 649 Tons. She carried 139 male and 40 female convicts to Sydney and had one male and one female [2] deaths recorded en-route. She departed Falmouth, England on the 21st of January 1811 and arrived in Sydney on the 2nd of July 1811. Master: Captain Andrew Barclay. Surgeon: Richard Hughes. 

ADMIRAL GAMBIER’ [2ND voyage] Built 1808 at Newcastle, England. Wood ship of 501 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and had 3 deaths en-route. She departed England on the 12th of May 1811 and arrived in Sydney on the 29th of September 1811. Master: Captain Edward Sindrey. 

FRIENDS’ Built 1799. Wood ship of 339 Tons. She was a foreign built vessel that carried 100 female convicts to Sydney. She had no deaths recorded en-route. She departed England about May 1811 and arrived Sydney on the 10th of October 1811. Master: Captain Jasper Ralph. 

                                              1812. 

GUILDFORD’ [1st voyage] Built 1810 in London. Wood ship of 521 Tons Length: 123.8 ft. Breadth: 31 ft. Depth: app 20ft. Height between decks: 5.10 ft. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed England on the 3rd of November 1811 and arrived Sydney on the 18th of January 1812. She was a foreign built vessel and her master was Captain Magnus Johnson who was probably a Swedish owner-master of the ship. 

                               2ND SHIP TO TASMANIA 

INDEFATIGABLE’ [1st voyage] Built at Whitby in 1799. Wood ship of 549 Tons. She carried 200 convicts to Hobart, Tasmania having departed England on the 4th of June 1812. She was almost on her way to Sydney when last minute orders were given for her to proceed to Tasmania. And so began the Tasmanian transportation of convicts. She sailed from London with the ship ‘Minstrel’ which ship was also taking convicts to NSW. Other convicts had of course arrived in Tasmania aboard the ‘Calcutta’ and also had been sent to Hobart by coastal shipping from Sydney, this, though was the first of many vessels to take their bedraggled cargoes to Tasmania. She arrived at Hobart on the 19th of October 1812. She had one death en-route. Master: Captain John Cross. 

MINSTREL’ [1ST voyage] Built 1810 at Hull. Wood ship of 351 Tons. Length: 104.5 ft. Breadth: 28.9 ft. Depth: app 19 ft. Height between decks: 6.4 ft. She carried 124 female convicts to Sydney. She had only one death en-route. She departed England on the 4th of June 1812 and arrived in Sydney on the 25th of October 1812. Master: Captain John Reid. Surgeon: Alexander Noble.

HMB ‘EMU’ Built c1805. Wood ten gun Brig of approximately 160 Tons. She embarked 140 female convicts and set sail for Hobart in company with the ship, ‘James Hay’ on the 11th of November 1812. The other vessel was soon left behind but ‘Emu’ was unlucky enough to meet the American Pirate ship ‘Holcar’. That vessel promptly bade the ‘Emu’ to heave to and took her as a prize ship. She escorted the ‘Emu’ to St Vincent Island where the female convicts and the master, Lieutenant Alexander Bisset RN, were deposited and the ‘Emu’ was taken to New York. She was a sister brig to HMB ‘Kangaroo’ which vessel was first [1815] to sail the coastal route to the tip of Cape York 

                                         1813. 

ARCHDUKE CHARLES’ Built 1809 at Newcastle, England. Wood ship of 525 Tons. She carried 147 male and 54 female convicts to Sydney and recorded 2 deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 15th of May1812 and arrived in Sydney on the 16th of February 1813. . Master: Captain J.P. Jeffries. Surgeon: John Pawson. 

FORTUNE’ [2nd voyage] Built Spain, Wood ship of 620 Tons. She carried 200 convicts to Sydney and had 4 deaths recorded for the voyage. She departed England on the 3rd of December 1812 and arrived in Sydney on the 11th of June 1813. Master: Captain T Walker. 

EARL SPENCER’ Built 1803 at London. Wood ship of 672 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and had 4 deaths en-route. She departed England on the 2nd of June 1813 and arrived on the 9th of October 1813. Master: Captain William Mitchell. Surgeon: D Mackenzie. 
        
                                             1814. 

WANSTEAD’ Built 1811. Wood ship of 253 Tons. She was built in America. She departed Spithead on the 24th of August 1813 with 119 female convicts aboard. She had 2 deaths en-route and arrived in Sydney on the 9th of January 1814. Master: Captain Henry Moore. 

GENERAL HEWART’ [also ‘General Hewitt’]. Built 1812 at Calcutta. Wood ship of 973 Tons. She carried 300 male convicts to Sydney and had 36 deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on July 28th 1813 and arrived in Sydney on the 7th of February 1814. Master: Captain Percival Earl. Surgeon: R. Hughes. 

CATHERINE’ Built at New Bedford in 1811. Wood ship of 325 Tons. She carried 98 female convicts to Sydney and recorded one [1] death en-route She departed Falmouth on the 8th of December 1813 and arrived Sydney on the 4th of May 1814. Master: Captain William Simmonds. Surgeon: Palmer. 

THREE BEES’ Built at Bridgewater in 1813. Wood ship of 459 Tons. She carried 219 male convicts to Sydney and recorded 9 deaths en-route. Conditions on board this vessel were foul and there were many sick and near dead aboard when she arrived in Sydney on the 6th of May 1814 after having departed Falmouth on the 8th of December 1813. This vessel also had an interesting end to her career, she was accidentally set afire and before the fire was discovered, she was too far-gone to save. She was cast adrift in the hope that she would be carried out on the tide but she wallowed about just offshore with flames rising up her masts and getting nearer to the loaded cannon and to her magazine which contained a goodly supply of gunpowder. Many people gathered on shore to watch the fire and wait to see what would happen when the guns and/or the magazine exploded. Sure enough, the cannons began firing late in the afternoon and it must have been of some amusement when a cannonball smashed through the front window of the resident Naval Officer. The ship continued to burn through the night and she went aground on the rocks at Bennalong Point where she eventually exploded and burned to the waterline. Master: Captain John Wallis. 

BROXENBURY’ Built in London in 1812. Wood ship of 720 Tons. She carried 120 female convicts to Sydney and recorded 2 deaths en-route. She departed England on the 22nd of February 1814 and arrived on the 28th of July 1814. Master: Captain Thomas Pitcher. Surgeon: Colin McLachlan. 

SURREY I’ Built at Harwich in 1811. Wood ship of 443 Tons. Length: 117.6 ft. Breadth: 29.6 ft. Depth: app 19ft. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and recorded 36 deaths en-route. Master: Captain J. Patterson. She departed England on the 22nd of February 1814 in company with the ‘Broxenbury’. ‘Surrey’ I, arrived in Sydney on the 28th of July 1814. She had the misfortune to be carrying convicts who had been exposed to the Typhus virus and it was only a few days after they had departed that the first of the convicts began to fall ill. She arrived at New South Wales with her captain, surgeon, and many of her crew down with the disease as well. The captain died when the ship was nearing Shoalhaven and it took a navigator from the ‘Broxenbury’ to take over from the captain. Her surgeon also died and the first and second mates with 36 convicts 6 seamen and four soldiers. This brought the total deaths from Typhus to 51 aboard this vessel. Her junior officer succeeded to the command of ‘Surrey I’ and although a very young man, he proved to have learned a valuable lesson from the horror of the first voyage. He was to become perhaps, one of the best of the convict ship captains. Her new master was Captain Thomas Raine, Surgeon: J Hamilton. 

SOMERSETSHIRE’ Built on the Thames river in London in 1810. Wood ship of 450 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and recorded only 1 death en-route. She departed Spithead on the 10th of May 1814 and arrived in Sydney on the 10th of October 1814. Master: Alexander Scott. 

                                           1815. 

MARQUIS OF WELLINGTON’ Built 1801 at Calcutta, India. Wood ship of 653 Tons. She departed England on the1st of September 1814 and arrived Sydney on the 27th of January 1815. She carried 199 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. Master: Captain George Betham. Surgeon: Thomas Leighton. 

INDEFATIGABLE’ [2nd voyage] Built 1799 at Whitby. Wood ship of 549 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and had 2 deaths en-route. She departed England about early December 1814. Arrived in Sydney on the 26th of April 1815. Master: Captain Mathew Bowles. 

NORTHAMPTON’ Built 1801 on the Thames River, London. Wood ship of 548 Tons. She carried 110 female convicts to Sydney and had 4 deaths recorded en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on the 1st of January 1815 and arrived Sydney on the 18th of June 1815 Master: Captain John O. Tween. Surgeon: Joshua Arnold. 

CANADA’ [3rd voyage] Built 1800 at Shields, England. Wood ship of 393 Tons. She carried 156 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths recorded en-route. Master: Captain John Grigg. Surgeon: Robert Browne. 

FRANCIS AND ELIZA’ Built 1782 on the Thames River, London. Wood ship of 345 Tons. She carried 54 male and 69 female convicts to Sydney. She recorded 2 male and 4 female deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 5th of December 1814 and arrived in Sydney on the 8th of August 1815. Master: Captain William Harrison. Surgeon: Major West. This vessel was almost a victim of the American ship ‘Warrior’ which captured her early in January 1815. This vessel was a 21-gun brig of 430 Tons and was under the command of Captain G. Champlin. She carried some 150 men and was far too strong for the luckless little convict ship. The ‘Warrior’ though was not interested in anything but the guns and ammunition from ‘Francis and Eliza’ and after being detained for a short period, she was allowed to sail on, minus a few of the crew who wished to go over to the Americans. The rest of the crew aboard the convict ship took hold of the hard liquor aboard the ‘Francis’ and became riotous but the convict, especially the men were well behaved and helped those of the crew who were not drunk and disorderly, to man the ship. When the ship reached Tenerife, the captain shipped his Chief mate and 4 of the crew back to England. She then sailed in convoy with the ship ‘Canada’ under escort with HMS ‘Ulysses’ and after leaving Sierra Leone, she had no further problems and arrived in Sydney three days after the Canada’. 

BARING’ [1st voyage] Built 1801 on the Thames, London. Wood ship of 842 Tons. She carried 300 Male convict to Sydney and had 2 deaths en-route. She departed England on the 20th of April 1815 and arrived in Sydney on the7th of September 1815. Master: Captain John Lamb. Surgeon: David Reid. 

                                              1816. 

FANNY I’ Built 1810 on the Thames. Wood ship of 432 Tons. She carried 174 male convicts to Sydney and had 3 deaths en-route. She departed the Downs [Kent] on the 25th of August 1815 and arrived in Sydney on the 18th of January 1816. Master: Captain John Wallis. Surgeon: William McDonald 

MARY ANNE I’ [1st voyage] Built 1807 at Batavia. Wood ship of 479 Tons. She carried 102 female convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed England about August 1815 and arrived in Sydney on the 19th of January 1816. It is possible she left England at the same time as the ‘Fanny I’ which arrived one day earlier than the ‘Mary Anne I’. Master: Captain John R. Arbuthnot. Surgeon: J. Bowman. 

OCEAN I’ Built 1800 at Quebec, Canada. Wood ship of 560 Tons. She carried 219 male convicts to Sydney and had one death recorded en-route She departed England about August 1815 and arrived in Sydney on the 30th of January 1816. . She also may have sailed in company with ‘Fanny’ and ‘Mary Anne’. Master: Captain Alexander Johnson. Surgeon: Edward F. Bromley. 

ALEXANDER II’ Built 1811 in America. Wood brig of 227 Tons. She carried 84 female convicts to Sydney and had 3 deaths en-route. She departed Ireland on the 4th of November 1815 and arrived in Sydney on the 4th of April 1816. Master: Captain William Hamilton. Surgeon: John W. Hallion 

GUILDFORD’ [2nd voyage] Built 1810 on the Thames. Wood ship of 521 Tons. Length: 123.8 ft. Breadth: 31 ft. Depth: approx., 21 ft. She carried 221 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Ireland about November 1815 and arrived in Sydney on the 8th of April 1816. It is thought that she sailed in company with the ‘Alexander II’. Master: Captain Magnus Johnson. Surgeon: Alexander Taylor. 

ATLAS III’ Built at Whitby in 1812. Wood ship of 501 Tons. She carried 188 convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on the 23rd of January 1816 and arrived in Sydney on the 22nd of July 1816. Master: Captain Walter Meriton. Surgeon: Patrick Hill. 

ELIZABETH I’ [1st voyage] Built at Chepstow in 1809. Wood ship of 481 Tons. She carried 153 male convicts to Sydney and had 2 deaths recorded en-route. She departed England on the 4th of June 1816 and arrived in Sydney on the 5th of October 1816. Master: Captain William Ostler. Surgeon: Carver Vickery. 

MARINER’ Built 1807. Wood ship of 449 Tons. She carried 145 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 4th of June 1816, probably in company with ‘Elizabeth I’ and she arrived in Sydney on the 11th of October 1816. Master: Captain John Herbert. Surgeon: John Haslam. 

SURREY’ [2nd voyage] Built 1811. Wood ship of 443 Tons. She carried 150 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 14th of July 1816 and arrived in Sydney on the 20th of December 1816. Master: Captain Thomas Raine. Surgeon: John F. Bayley. 

                                             1817. 

LORD MELVILLE I’ [1st voyage] Built 1805 at Shields, England. Wood ship of 412 Tons. She carried 101 female convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed England on the 18th of September 1816 and arrived in Sydney on the 24h of February 1817. Master: Captain Thackery Wetherell. Surgeon: Daniel McNamara. 

FAME’ Built 1812 at Quebec, Canada. Wood ship of 404 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed Spithead, England on the 9th of October 1816 and arrived in Sydney on the 8th of March 1817. Master: Captain Henry Dale. Surgeon: John Mortimer. 

SIR WILLIAM BENSLEY’ Built 1803 at Ipswich, England. Wood ship of 584 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts and had one death en-route. She departed England in October 1816 and arrived on the 10th of March 1817 on which voyage she probably departed and ran in company with ‘Fame’. Master: Captain Lewis E. Williams. Surgeon: William Evans. 

MORLEY’ [1st voyage] Built 1811 at London. Wood ship of 480 Tons. She carried 175 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 18th of December 1816 and arrived Sydney on the 10th of April 1817.Master: Captain Robert R. Brown. Surgeon: Robert Espie. 

SHIPLEY’ [1st voyage] Built 1805. Wood ship of 381 Tons. She carried 125 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths recorded en-route. She departed England on the 18th of December 1816 and arrived in Sydney on the 24th of April 1817. Master: Captain Lewis W. Moncrief. Surgeon: George W. Clayton. 

CHAPMAN’ [1st voyage] Built at Whitby, England in 1777. Wood ship of 558 Tons. Length: 116 ft. Breadth: 33ft. Had most of her timbers replaced in 1798 and was still bouncing around the waves in 1851. She carried 198 male convicts to Sydney and had 14-convict deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 14th of March 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 20th of July 1817. Master: Captain John Drake. Surgeon: Alexander Dewar. Gunshot wounds were the main cause of deaths aboard this vessel on this voyage. She was under threat of mutiny and the officers had been warned and were ready for trouble, all 10 convicts died from their wounds. Two of the ship’s crew was also killed and two convicts died of dysentery. 

PILOT’ Built at Newcastle in 1813. Wood ship of 392 Tons. She carried 117 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 9th of March 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 29th of July 1817. Master: Captain William Pexton. Surgeon: Charles Quade. 

CANADA’ [4th voyage] Built at Shields in 1800. Wood ship of 393 Tons. She carried 89 female convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 21st of March 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 6th of August 1817. Master: Captain John Grigg. Surgeon: Jasper Allan. 

ALMORAH’ [1st voyage] Built at Selby, England in 1817. Wood ship of 416 Tons. She carried 180 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed the Downs [Kent] on the 26th of April 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 29th of August 1817. Master: Captain William McKissock. Surgeon: Edward F. Brown. 

LORD ELDON’ Built at Shields in 1802. Wood ship of 583 Tons. She carried 219 convicts to Sydney and had 4 deaths en-route. She departed England on the 9th of April 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 30th of September 1817. Master: Captain Jasper T. Lamb. Surgeon: J. Bowman. 

LARKINS’ [1st voyage] Built 1808 at Calcutta, India. Wood ship of 676 Tons. She carried 249 convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on the 20th of July 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 22nd of November 1817. Master: Captain Henry R.Wilkinson. Surgeon: William McDonald. 

                                            1818. 

OCEAN II’ [1st voyage] Built at Whitby, Yorkshire in 1808. Wood ship of 437 Tons. She carried 180 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Spithead, England on the 21st of August 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 10th of January 1818. Master: Captain Samuel Remmington. Surgeon: George Fairfowl. 

FRIENDSHIP’ Built 1793 at London, Wood ship of 441 Tons. She carried 101 female convicts to Sydney and had 4 deaths en-route. She departed England on the 3rd of July 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 14th of January 1818. Master: Captain Andrew Armet. Surgeon: Peter Cosgreave. 

GUILDFORD’ [3rd voyage] Built 1810. Wood ship of 521 Tons. Length: 123.8 ft. Breadth: 31 ft. Depth: approx. 21 ft. She carried 199 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 14th of November 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 1st of April 1818. Master: Captain Magnus Johnson. Surgeon: Archibald Hume. 

BATAVIA’ Built 1802 at Topsham, England. Wood ship of 566 Tons. She carried 220 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Plymouth, England on the 1st of November 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 5th of April 1818. Master: Captain William B. Lamb. Surgeon: J. Billing. 

LADY CASTLEREAGH’ Built 1802 at London. Wood ship of 842 Tons. She carried 300 male convicts and landed 39 in Sydney and 261 in Hobart. She departed England on the 22nd of February 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 30th of April 1818 and then proceeded to Hobart where she arrived on the 11th of June 1818. Master: Captain George Weltden. Surgeon: J. Craigie. 

MINERVA I’ [1st voyage] Built 1804 at Lancaster. Wood ship of 530 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Hobart, Tasmania and had three deaths en-route. She departed Ireland on the 1st of January 1818 and arrived in Hobart on the 30th of April 1818. Master: Captain John Bell. Surgeon: J. Hunter. 

LORD MELVILLE I’ [2nd voyage] Built Shieldsin 1805. Wood ship of 412 Tons. She carried 148 male convicts to Hobart and had one death en-route. She departed England in July 1818 and arrived in Hobart on the 17th of December 1818.Master: Captain Thackary Wetherell. Surgeon: John McMillan. 

NEPTUNE I’ [1st voyage] Built at Whitby in 1810. Wood ship of 477 Tons. She carried 170 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed the Downs [Kent] on the 20th of December 1817 and arrived in Sydney on the 5th of May 1818. Master: Captain Robert Carns. Surgeon: Thomas Reid. 

GLORY’ Built at Quebec in 1811. Wood ship of 399 Tons. She carried 170 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed England about March 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 14th of September 1818. Master: Captain Edward Pounder. Surgeon: William Stewart. 

ISABELLA I’ [1st voyage] Built on the Thames in 1818. Wood ship of 427 Tons. She carried 230 male convicts to Sydney and had three deaths en-route. She departed Spithead on the 3rd of April 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 14th of September 1818. Master: Captain Robert Berry. Surgeon: John W. Hallion. 

MARIA I’ [1st voyage] Built at Gainsborough in 1798. Wood ship of 427 Tons. She carried 126 female convicts to Australia and had two deaths en-route. She landed 94 female convicts at Sydney and 30 female convicts at Hobart. She departed Deal, England on the 15th of May 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 17th of September 1818. She then proceeded to Hobart and deposited 30 convicts at that settlement. Master: Captain Henry Williams. Surgeon: Thomas Prosser. 

TOTTENHAM’ Built 1802 at Stockton . Wood ship of 557 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and had 10 deaths en-route. She departed Spithead on the 27th of March 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 14th of October 1818. Master: Captain Dougald McDougald. Surgeon: Robert Armstrong. 

MORLEY’ [2nd voyage] Built 1811 at London. Wood ship of 480 Tons. She carried 164 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed the Downs [Kent] on the 18th of July 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 7th of November 1818.Master: Captain Robert R. Brown. Surgeon: John Whitmarsh. 

SHIPLEY’ [2nd voyage] Built 1805 at Whitby. Wood ship of 381 Tons. She departed Woolwich on the 18th of July 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 18th of November 1818. Master: Captain L. W Moncrief. Surgeon: Robert Espie. 

ELIZABETH I’ [2nd voyage] Built 1809 at Chepstow, England. Wood ship of 482 Tons. She carried 101 female convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 26th of July 1818 and arrived Sydney on the 19th of November 1818. Master: Captain William Ostler. Surgeon: William Hamilton. 

EARL ST VINCENT’ [1st voyage] Built 1800 at Topsham, England. Wood ship of 412 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had three deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 7th of August 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 16th of December 1818. Master: Captain Samuel Simpson. Surgeon: John Johnson.

'HADLOW’ [1st voyage] Built 1813 at Quebec, Canada. Wood ship of 372 Tons. She carried 150 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed England in August 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 24th of December 1818. Master: Captain John Craigie. Surgeon: Thomas C. Roylance. 

MARTHA’ Built 1810 at Quebec, Canada. Wood ship of 410 Tons. She carried 170 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 18th of August 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 24th of December 1818. Master: Captain John Apsey. Surgeon: Morgan Price. 

GENERAL STEWART’ Built 1801 on the Thames River, England. Wood ship of 635 Tons. She carried 250 male convicts to Sydney and had 4 deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on the 19th of July 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 31st of December 1818. Master: Captain Robert Granger. Surgeon: Andrew Smith. 

                                            1819. 

TYNE’ Built 1806 on the Thames River. Wood ship of 486 Tons. She carried 180 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland in mid August 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 4th of January 1819. Master: Captain Casey Bell. Surgeon: Henry Ryan. 

GLOBE’ Built 1810 at Scarborough. Wood ship of 363 Tons. She carried 140 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England about July 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 8th of January 1819. Master: Captain Joseph Blyth. Surgeon: George Clayton. 

SURREY I’ [3rd voyage] Built 1811 at Harwich. Wood ship of 443 Tons. Length: 117.6 ft. Breadth: 29.6 ft. Depth: approx. 19 ft. She carried 160 male convicts to Australia. She arrived in Sydney on the 4th of March 1819 and landed 7 convicts at that port. She was then ordered to Hobart and arrived there on the 18th of March 1819 landing 150 male convicts She had 3 deaths en-route after departing Sheerness on the 29th of September 1818. Master: Captain Thomas Raine. Surgeon: Mathew Anderson 

LORD SIDMOUTH’ [1st voyage] Built at Shields in 1817. Wood ship of 411 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had 2 deaths en-route. She departed Sheerness on the 20th of September 1818 and arrived in Sydney on the 11th of March 1819. Master: Captain William Gunner. Surgeon: Archibald Lang. 

BARING’ [2nd voyage] Built 1801 on the Thames River. Wood ship of 842 Tons. She carried 300 male convicts to Sydney and then also landed 5 male convicts at Hobart, Tasmania. She had 5 deaths en-route. She departed the Downs [Kent] on the 27th of January 1819 and arrived in Sydney on the 26th of June 1919. She had earlier landed five of her male convicts at Hobart on the 14th of June 1819. Master: Captain John Lamb. Surgeon: David Reid. 

BENCOOLEN’ Built 1818 at Liverpool. Wood ship of 416 Tons. She carried 150 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 24th April 1819 and arrived Sydney on the 25th of August 1819. Master: Captain Joseph B. Anstice. Surgeon: William Evans. 

MARY I’ Built 1811 at Bideford. Wood Ship of 405 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland in about May 1819 and arrived at Sydney on the 26th of August 1819. Master: Captain John Lusk. Surgeon: J Morgan. 

HIBERNIA’ [1st voyage] Built 1810 at Cowes, England. Wood ship of 430 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Hobart, Tasmania and had three deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on the 20th of November 1818 and arrived at Hobart on the 11th of May 1819. 

CANADA’ [5th voyage] Built 1800 at Shields. Wood ship of 383 Tons. She carried 135 male convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed London, England on the 23rd of April 1819 and arrived at Sydney on the 1st of September 1819. Master: Alexander Spain. Surgeon: Daniel McNamara. 

DAPHNE’ Built 1806 at Topham, England. Wood ship of 553 Tons. She carried 180 male convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 28th of May 1819 and arrived in Sydney on the 21st of September 1819. Master: Captain Hugh Mattison. Surgeon: Robert Armstrong. 

JOHN BARRY’ [1st voyage] Built 1814 at Whitby. Wood ship of 530 Tons. She carried 142 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 30th of April 1819 and arrived in Sydney on the 26th of September 1819. Master: Captain Stephen Ellerby. Surgeon: J. Bowman. 

ATLAS I’ [2nd voyage] Built 1801 at Shields. Wood ship of 437 Tons. She carried 156 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Gravesend on the 10th of June 1819 and arrived Sydney on the 19th of October 1819. Master: Captain Joseph Short. Surgeon: John Duke. 

GRENADA’ [1st voyage] Built 1810 at Hull. Wood ship of 408 Tons. She carried 152 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 8th of May 1819 and arrived Sydney on the 21ST OF October 1819. Master: Captain Andrew Donald. Surgeon: Emanuel Lazzaretto. 

MALABAR’ [1st voyage] Built 1804 at Shields. Wood ship of 525 Tons. She carried 170 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Spithead on the 17th of June 1819and arrived Sydney on the 30th of October 1819. Master: Captain William Ascough. Surgeon: Evan Evans. 

RECOVERY’ [1st voyage] Built 1799 at Batavia. Wood ship of 493 Tons. She carried 188 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Woolwich on the 31st of July 1819 and arrived Sydney on the 18th of December 1819. Master: Captain William Fotherly. Surgeon: Peter Cunningham. 

MINERVA I’ [2nd voyage] Built 1804 at Lancaster, England. Wood ship of 530 Tons. She carried 172 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 26th of August 1819 and arrived Sydney on the 17th of December 1819. Master: Captain John Bell. Surgeon: Charles Queade. 

                                            1820 

LORD WELLINGTON’ Built 1810 at Chatham, England. Wood ship of 399 Tons. She carried 121 female convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Queenstown in 1819 and arrived Sydney on the 20th of January 1820. Master: Captain Lew Hill. Surgeon: Edward F. Bromley. 

ELIZA I’ [1st voyage] Built 1806 in India. Wood ship of 511 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed England on the 16th of October 1819 and arrived in Sydney on the 21st of January 1820.Master: Captain Francis Hunt. Surgeon: J.M. Brydone. 

PRINCE REGENT I’ [1st voyage] Built 1810 at Shields. Wood ship of 527 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed England in about October 1819 and arrived Sydney on the 27th of January 1820. Master: Captain William Anderson. Surgeon: J. Hunter. 

CASTLE FORBES’ [1st voyage] Built 1818 at Aberdeen. Wood ship of 439 Tons. She carried 140 male convicts to Australia and had no deaths en-route. She landed 136 male convicts at Hobart and four male convicts at Sydney. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 3rd of October 1819 and arrived Sydney on the 27th of January 1820. She then sailed for Hobart, Arriving there on the 1st of March 1820. Master: Captain Thomas Reid. Surgeon: J. Scott.

HMS ‘DROMEDARY’ Wood ship of the British Navy. She carried 369 male convicts to Australia, landing 347 at Hobart and 22 male convicts at Sydney. She had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 11th of September 1819 and arrived Hobart on the 10th of January, 1820. She then sailed for Sydney and arrived at that port on the 28th of January 1820. Master: Captain Richard Skinner RN. Surgeon: George Fairfowl. 

CALEDONIA’ [1st voyage] Built 1815 at Sunderland. Wood ship of 412 Tons. She carried 150 male convicts to Hobart and had no deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 14th of May 1820 and arrived in Hobart on the 17th of November 1820.Master: Captain Robert Carns. Surgeon: Alexander Jack.

HMS ‘COROMANDEL II’ Wood ship of the British Navy. She carried 300 male convicts to Australia and had no deaths en-route. She landed 150 male convicts at Hobart and 150 male convicts at Sydney. She departed Spithead on the 1st of November 1819 and she arrived at Hobart on the 12th of March 1820 and then sailed for Sydney, arriving at that port on the 4th of April 1820. Master: Captain J. Downie RN. Surgeon: Archibald Hume. 

MARIA I’ [2nd voyage] Built 1798 at Gainsborough, England. Wood ship of 427 Tons. She carried 156 male convicts to Hobart and had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 28th of July 1820 and arrived at Hobart on the 1st of December 1820. Master: Captain Harris Walker. Surgeon: William Hamilton. 

JANUS’ Built 1810 at New York, USA. Wood ship of 308 Tons. She carried 105 female convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 5th of December 1819 and arrived at Sydney on the 3rd of May 1820. Master: Captain Thomas J. Mowatt. Surgeon: J. Creagh 

NEPTUNE’I [2nd voyage] Built 1810 at Whitby. Wood ship of 477 Tons. She carried 156 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed the Downs on the 23rd of March 1820 and arrived Sydney on the 16th of July 1820. Master: Captain William McKissock. Surgeon: J. Mitchell. 

JULIANA’ Built 1798 at India. Wood ship of 516 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Hobart and had one death en-route. She departed England on the 3rd of September 1820 and arrived at Hobart on the 28th of December 1820. Master: Captain David Ogilvie. Surgeon: William Graham. 

HADLOW’ [2ND voyage] Built 1813 at Quebec. Wood ship of 372 Tons. She carried 150 male convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 2nd of April 1820 and arrived at Sydney on the 5th of August 1820. Master: Captain John Craigie. Surgeon: Morgan Price. 

MANGLES’ [1st voyage] Built 1802 at Bengal. Wood ship of 594 Tons. Length: 121.2 ft. Breadth: 32.3 ft. Depth: app 21 ft. She carried 190 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Falmouth on the 11th of April 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 7th of August 1820. Master: Captain John Cogill. Surgeon: Mathew Anderson. 

EARL ST VINCENT’ [2nd voyage] Built 1800 at Topham, England. Wood ship of 412 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 12th of April 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 16th of August 1820. Master: Captain Samuel Simpson. Surgeon: Patrick Hill. 

DOROTHY’ Built 1815 at Liverpool. Wood ship of 416 Tons. She carried 190 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 5th of May 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 19th of September 1820. Master: Captain John Hargraves. Surgeon: Robert Espie. 

AGAMEMNON’ Built 1811 at Sunderland. Wood ship of 542 Tons. She carried 179 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on the 3rd of May 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 22nd of September 1820. Master: Captain Robert Surtees. Surgeon: J. Hall. 

SHIPLEY’ [3rd voyage] Built 1806 at Whitby. Wood ship of 381 Tons. She carried 149 male convicts to Australia and had four deaths en-route. She landed 61 male convicts at Hobart and 85 male convicts at Sydney. She departed the Downs on the 5th of June 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 26th of September 1820. Master: Captain Lewis W. Moncreif. Surgeon: Henry Ryan. 

GUILDFORD’ [4th voyage] Built 1810 at London. Wood ship of 521 Tons. Length: 123.8 ft. Breadth: 31 ft. Depth: approx. 21 ft. She carried 190 male convicts to Hobart and had one death en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 14th of May 1820 and arrived at Hobart on the 28th of October 1820. Master: Captain Magnus Johnson. Surgeon: Hugh Walker. 

MORLEY’ [3rd voyage] Built 1811 on the Thames River. Wood ship of 492 Tons. She carried 121 female convicts to Australia and had no deaths en-route. She landed 50 female convicts at Hobart and 71 female convicts at Sydney. She departed London on the 22nd of May 1820 and arrived in Hobart on the 30th of September 1820. Master: Captain Robert R. Brown. Surgeon: Thomas Reid. 

ALMORAH’ [2nd voyage] Built 1817 at Selby, England. Wood ship of 416 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to, Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Waterford on the 22nd of August 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 22nd of December 1820. Master: Captain Thomas Wilson. Surgeon: Samuel Alexander. 

ASIA I’ [1st voyage] Built 1819 at Aberdeen, Scotland. Wood ship of 532 Tons. She carried 190 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed England on the 3rd of September 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 28th of December 1820. Master: Captain J. Morice. Surgeon: William B. Carlyle. 

ELIZABETH I’ [3rd voyage] Built 1809 at Chepstow, England. Wood ship of 482 Tons. She carried 171 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed the Downs on the 18th of August 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 31st of December 1820. Master: Captain William Ostler. Surgeon: Andrew Montgomery. 

HEBE’ Built 1809 at Hull, England. Wood ship of 434 Tons. She carried 159 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route She departed England on the 31st of July 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 31st of December 1820. Master: Captain Thackery Wetherell. Surgeon: Charles Carter. 

                                               1821. 

PRINCE REGENT II’ Built 1811 at Rochester, England. Wood ship of 383 Tons. She carried 144 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 19th of September 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 9th of January 1821. Master: Captain Francis Clifford. Surgeon: Alexander Taylor. 

PRINCE OF ORANGE’ Built 1813 at Sunderland, England. Wood ship of 359 Tons. She carried 136 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed the Downs on the 8th of October 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 12th of February 1821. Master: Captain Thomas Silk. Surgeon: George S. Rutherford. 

MEDWAY’ [1st voyage] Built 1810 at Rochester. Wood ship of 435 Tons. She carried 156 male convicts to Hobart and had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 13th of November 1820 and arrived at Hobart on the 13th of March 1821. Master: Captain Borthwick Wight. Surgeon: Thomas Davis. 

LORD SIDMOUTH’ Built 1817 at Shields. Wood ship of 411 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 4th of November 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 19th of February 1821. Master: Captain J. Muddle. Surgeon: Thomas C. Roylance. 

LADY RIDLEY’ Built 1813 at Blythe. Wood ship of 373 Tons. She carried 138 male convicts to Hobart and had one death en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 14th of January 1821 and arrived at Hobart on the 27th June 1821. Master: Captain Robert Weir. Surgeon: J. Wilson. 

DICK’ Built 1788 at London. Wood ship of 398 Tons. She carried 140 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 4th of November 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 12th of March 1821. Master: Captain William Harrison. Surgeon: Robert Armstrong.

'SPEKE’ Built 1790 at Calcutta. Wood ship of 473 Tons. She carried 156 male convicts Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed England on the 22nd of December 1820 and arrived in Sydney on the 18th of May 1821. Master: Captain Peter McPherson. Surgeon: Edward Coates. 

COUNTESS OF HARCOURT’ [1st voyage] Built 1811 in India. Wood ship of 517 Tons. She carried 172 male convicts to Hobart and had no deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 19th of April 1821 and arrived at Hobart on the 27th of July 1821. Master: Captain George Bunn. Surgeon: Morgan Price. 

ADAMANT’ Built 1811 at Blythe, England. Wood ship of 427 Tons. She carried 144 male convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed England on the 29th of March 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 8th of September 1821. Master: Captain William Ebsworthy. Surgeon: 

GRENADA’ Built 1810 at Hull. Wood ship of 408 Tons. She carried 152 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 29th of July 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 16th of September 1821. Master: Captain Andrew Donald. Surgeon: Peter Cunningham. 

JOHN BARRY’ [2nd voyage] Built 1814 at Whitby. Wood ship of 520 Tons. She carried 180 male convicts To Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 16th of June 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 7th of November 1821. Master: Captain Roger Dobson. Surgeon: Daniel McNamara. 

HINDOSTAN’ Built 1819 at Whitby. Wood ship of 424 Tons. She carried 152 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on the 29th of July 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 24th of November 1821. Master: Captain William Williamson. Surgeon: William Elyard. 

MALABAR’ [2nd voyage] Built 1804 at Shields. Wood ship of 525 Tons. She carried 171 male convicts to Hobart and had no deaths en-route. She departed Gravesend, England, on the 22nd of June 1821 and arrived at Hobart on the 21st of October 1821. Master: Captain William Ainscough. Surgeon: John Thompson. 

MINERVA I’ Built 1804 at Lancaster, England. Wood ship of 530 Tons. She carried 172 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed the Downs, Kent on the 1st of August 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 16th of December 1821. Master: Captain John Bell. Surgeon: Charles Quade. 

CLAUDINE’ [1st voyage] Built 1811 at Calcutta. Wood ship of 452 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Hobart and had one death en-route. She departed Woolwich on the 24th of August 1821 and arrived at Hobart on the 15th of December 1821. Master: Captain John Crabtree. Surgeon: Henry Ryan. 

PROVIDENCE II’ [1st voyage] Built 1812 at Lynn, England. Wood ship of 380 Tons. She carried 103 female convicts to Australia landing 53 female convicts in Hobart and 50 female convicts in Sydney. She had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 13th of June 1821 and arrived at Hobart on the 18th of December 1821.She then proceeded to Sydney arrived on the 7th of January 1822. Master: Captain J. Herd. Surgeon: David Reed. 

JOHN BULL’ Built 1799 at Liverpool. Wood ship of 464 Tons. She carried 80 female convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 25th of July 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 18th of December 1821. Master: Captain William Corlett. Surgeon: William Elyard. 

LORD HUNGERFORD’ Built England c1810. Wood ship of 707 Tons. She carried 228 male convicts to Hobart and had no deaths en-route. She departed England in July of 1821 and arrived at Hobart on the 26th of December 1821. Master: Captain Michael O’Brien. Surgeon: Michael Dorke. 

                                                1822. 

PROVIDENCE II’ Built 1812 at Lynn. Wood ship of 380 Tons. She carried 103 female convicts to Australia and landed 53 female convicts at Hobart and 50 female convicts at Sydney. She had no deaths en-route. She departed England on the 13th of June 1821 and arrived Sydney on the 7th of January 1822. Master: Captain J. Herd. Surgeon: David Reid.

'MARY II’ Built 1813 at Calcutta. Wood ship of 547 Tons. She carried 176 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth, England on the 5th of September 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 23rd of January 1822. Master: Captain Charles Arcoll. Surgeon: John Rodmell 

RICHMOND’ Built c1810 in England. Wood ship of 466 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Hobart and had one death en-route. She departed Sheerness on the 27th of November 1821 and arrived at Hobart on the 30th of April 1822. Master: Captain J. Kay. Surgeon: Thomas B. Wilson.

PHOENIX I’ [1st voyage] Built 1810 at Topsham, England. Wood ship of 493 Tons. She carried 184 male convicts to Hobart and had two deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 20th of December 1821 and arrived in Hobart on the 20th of May 1822. Master: Captain Thomas Wetherhead. Surgeon: Evan Evans. 

SOUTHWORTH’ Built 1821. Wood ship of 350 Tons. She carried 101 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 18th of November 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 9th of March 1822. Master: Captain David Sampson. Surgeon: Joseph Cook. 

PRINCE OF ORANGE’ [2nd voyage] Built 1813. Wood ship of 359 Tons. She carried 136 male convicts to Hobart and had four deaths en-route. She departed England on the 1st of April 1822 and arrived in Hobart on the 23rd of July 1822. Master: Captain John Moncreif. Surgeon: John Crocket. 

ISABELLA I’ Built 1818 at London. Wood ship of 579 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 4th of November 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 9th of March 1822. Master: Captain John Wallis. Surgeon: W. Price. 

SHIPLEY’ Built 1805 at Whitby. Wood ship of 381 Tons. She carried 150 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed London on the 7th of November 1821 and arrived in Sydney on the 11th of March 1822. Master: Captain Lewis .W. Moncreif. Surgeon: George S. Rutherford. 

CALEDONIA’ [2nd voyage] Built 1815 at Sunderland. Wood ship of 412 Tons. She carried 150 male convicts to Sydney and had six deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 19th of June 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 6th of November 1822. Master: Captain Robert Carns. Surgeon: W. Williamson 

MARY ANNE I’ [2nd voyage] Built 1807 at Batavia. Wood ship of 479 Tons. She carried 108 female convicts to Australia and had one death en-route. She landed 45 female convicts at Hobart and 62 female convicts at Sydney. She departed Portsmouth on the 25th of December 1821 and arrived at Hobart on the 20th of May 1822. Master: Captain Henry Warington. Surgeon: J. Hall. 

ARAB. I’ [1st voyage] Built 1820 at Greenock, Scotland. Wood ship of 403 Tons. She carried 156 male convicts to Hobart and had three deaths en-route. She departed England on the 13th of July 1822 and arrived at Hobart on the 6th of November 1822. Master: Captain Robert R. Brown. Surgeon: Charles Carter. 

GUILDFORD’ Built 1810 on the Thames River. Wood ship of 521 Tons. Length: 123.8 ft. Breadth: 31 ft. Depth: approx. 21 ft. She carried 190 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed London on the 7th of April 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 15th of July 1822. Master: Captain Magnus Johnson. Surgeon: J. Mitchell. 

ASIA I’ Built 1819 at Aberdeen. Wood ship of 532 Tons. She carried 190 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed England on the 4th of April 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 24th of July 1822. Master: Captain Thomas L. Reid. Surgeon: J. A. Mercer. 

MANGLES’ Built 1802 at Bengal. Wood ship of 594 Tons. Length: 121.2 ft. Breadth: 32.3 ft. Depth: approx. 19ft. She carried 190 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 21st of June 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 8th of November 1822. Master: Captain John Cogill. Surgeon: Matthew Anderson. 

ELIZA I’ Built 1806 at India. Wood ship of 511 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Sheerness on the 20th of July 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 22nd of November 1822. Master: Captain J. Hunt. Surgeon: William Rae. 

COUNTESS OF HARCOURT’ Built 1811 in India. Wood ship of 517 Tons. She carried 172 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 3rd of September 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 21st of December 1822. Master: Captain George Dunn. Surgeon: Robert Armstrong. 

                                               1823. 

MORLEY’ [4th voyage] Built 1811 on the Thames River. Wood ship of 480 Tons. She carried 172 male convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed the Downs on the 25th of September 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 11th of January 1823. Master: Captain George Holliday. Surgeon: William B. Carlyle. 

LORD SIDMOUTH’ [3rd voyage] Built 1817 at Shields. Wood ship of 411 Tons. She carried 97 female convicts to Australia and had one death en-route. She landed 50 female convicts at Hobart and 46 female convicts at Sydney. She departed Woolwich on the 11th of September 1822 and arrived at Hobart on the 10th of February 1823. She then proceeded to Sydney and arrived at that Port on the 27th of February 1823. Master: Captain J. Ferrier. Surgeon: Robert Espie. 

SURREY I’ Built 1811 at Harwich. Wood ship of 443 Tons. Length: 117.6 ft. Breadth: 32.3 ft. Depth: approx. 21 ft. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had three deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 5th of October 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 4th of March 1823. Master: Captain Thomas Raine. Surgeon: Charles Linton. 

‘PRINCESS ROYAL’ [1st voyage] Built 1794 at Yarmouth. Wood ship of 402 Tons. She carried 156 male convicts to Sydney and had two deaths en-route. She departed England on the 5th of November 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 9th of March 1823. Master: Captain Henry Sherwood. Surgeon: J. Hunter. 

 ‘BRAMPTON’ Built 1817 at Lynn. Wood ship of 432 Tons. She carried 172 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 8th of November 1822 and arrived in Sydney on the 22nd of April 1823. Master: Captain Samuel Moore. Surgeon: Morgan Price. 

WOODMAN’ [1st voyage] Built 1808 at Gainsborough. Wood ship of 419 Tons. She carried 97 female convicts to Sydney and had three deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 25th of January 1823 and arrived in Sydney on the 25th of June 1823. Master: Captain Henry Ford. Surgeon: George Fairfowl. 

RECOVERY’ [2nd voyage] Built 1799 at Batavia. Wood ship of 483 Tons. She carried 180 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 5th of April 1823 and arrived in Sydney on the 30th of July 1823. Master: Captain William Fotherly. Surgeon: Peter Cunningham. 

HENRY’ [1st voyage] Built 1819 at Quebec, Canada. Wood ship of 386 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Sydney and had no deaths en-route. She departed London on the 10th of June 1823 and arrived in Sydney on the 26th of August 1823. Master: Captain Thomas Thatcher. Surgeon: Thomas Davies. 

OCEAN II’ [2nd voyage] Built 1808 at Whitby. Wood ship of 437 Tons. She carried 171 male convicts to Sydney and had six deaths en-route. She departed Portsmouth on the 24th of April 1823 and arrived in Sydney on the 27th of August 1823. Master: Captain William Harrison. Surgeon: J. McTernan. 

COMPETITOR’ [1st voyage] Built 1813 at Whitby. Wood ship of 425 Tons. She carried 160 male convicts to Hobart and had three deaths en-route. She departed. England on the 18th of March 1823 and arrived at Hobart on the 3rd of August 1823. Master: Captain William Ainscough. Surgeon: George Clayton. 

COMMODORE HAYES’ Built 1817 at Calcutta. Wood ship of 678 Tons. She carried 219 male convicts to Hobart and had three deaths en-route. She departed England on the 26th of April 1823 and arrived at Hobart on the 16th of August 1823. Master: Captain Lewis W. Moncreif. Surgeon: George S. Rutherford. 

ALBION’ [1st voyage] Built 1813 at Bristol. Wood ship of 479 Tons. She carried 200 male convicts to Hobart and had no deaths en-route. She departed Spithead on the 20th of May 1823 and arrived at Hobart on the 21st of October 1823. Master: Captain W. R. Best. Surgeon: J. A. Mercer. 

EARL ST VINCENT’ [3rd voyage] Built 1800 at Topham. Wood ship of 412 Tons. She carried 157 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 29th of April 1823 and arrived in Sydney on the 9th of September 1823. Master: Captain Peter John Reeves. Surgeon: Robert Tainsh. 

MARY III’ [1st voyage] Built 1811 at Ipswich. Wood ship of 361 Tons. She carried 126 female convicts to Australia and landed 67 female convicts at Hobart and 59 female convicts at Sydney. She had no deaths en-route. She departed London on the 10th of June 1823 and arrived at Hobart on the 5th of October 1823. She then proceeded to Sydney and arrived at that Port on the 18th of October 1823. Master: Captain J. F. Steel. Surgeon: Harmon Cochrane. 

ISABELLA I’ [3rd voyage] Built 1818 on the Thames River. Wood ship of 579 Tons. She carried 200 female convicts to Sydney and had five deaths en-route. She departed Ireland about late July 1823 and arrived in Sydney on the 16th of December 1823. Master: Captain John Wallis. Surgeon” William Rae. 

MEDINA’ [1st voyage] Built 1811 at Topham. Wood ship of 467 Tons. She carried 177 male convicts to Sydney and had one death en-route. She departed Cork, Ireland on the 5th of September 1823 and arrived in Sydney on the 29th of December 1823. Master: Captain Robert Brown. Surgeon: John Rodmell 

SIR GODFREY WEBSTER’ [1st voyage] Built 1799 on the Thames River. Wood ship of 548 Tons. She carried 180 male convicts to Hobart and had no deaths en-route. She departed London on the 1st of September 1823 and arrived at Hobart on the 30 of December 1823. Master: Captain John Rennoldson. Surgeon: Charles Carter.



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